Wind Turbines and Dead Whales. Nuclear Energy and Solar Panels.

After a third explosion at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant  in Japan, the pro nuclear power lobby must be watching their case ebb away in silence.  The situation is changing day by day but already confidence in the nuclear industry has been rocked to the core.  Manufacturers of wind turbines must be sensing an opportunity for growth.

However, before those who oppose any form of nuclear power (particularly in countries that have a low earthquake risk) can look forward to a rapid increase in the construction of alternative forms of technology there is much work to be done.

A story in The Daily Telegraph today describes how  scientists at the University of St Andrews have found evidence suggesting that one of the main reasons why (beaked) whales become stranded and die on British beaches is because they are disoriented by the offshore wind farms.

Last August it was claimed by the Seal Mammal Research Unit at St Andrews that offshore wind farms might be responsible for a spate of mysterious seal deaths.  This was denied by both the companies that construct the turbines and the wind farm operators.

Meanwhile, there have been all kinds of stories appearing the press suggesting that large wind turbines can have a fatal impact on sea birds, and in the case of land based turbines, birds and bats.

Now there’s another piece in The Daily Telegraph about the flickering of light caused by the rotating blades.

A report commissioned by the Department for Energy and Climate Change recommended that turbines should be built no closer than 10 rotor diameters from the nearest home.

Perhaps now more than ever we should lessen the reliance for the supply of energy to homes and small businesses on centralised sources and instead encourage the gradual transition to homes and industrial units that all have some degree of self-contained solar and wind generated energy.

In short, stick some solar panels on your roof and put up your own wind generator or erect a communal turbine for a collection of houses.

Nationally we could also be following the example of the pioneers at the Eden Project who, together with EGS Energy, are to build one of the first geo thermal power plants in the UK, generating both heat and electricity.

Another option is to share energy in groups within communities in the way being suggested by EnergyShare.com

Update:  The Daily Telegraph later published a correction to the original story:

Prof Ian Boyd, of the University of St Andrews, said the construction of offshore renewable energy sites is likely to cause some species to move to other areas and to distrub their feeding and reproductive cycles. At present it is not possible to predict precisely how this will affect their populations.

However, he wished to correct a report on this website this week that said there was a proven link between off-shore wind farms and strandings.

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