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Airbus A330 Seating Plan – How To Read A Seat Map

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The Airbus A330 seating plan varies from one airline to the next and according to the specific model of aircraft. These include the A330-200, 300, 800, and 900.

The Airbus A330 is a popular medium to long-range commercial passenger aircraft. It is also used as a freighter or cargo aircraft, a corporate jet, and a military tanker. The unmistakable BelugaXL is also an Airbus A330. The latest member of the family is the A330neo.

This aircraft range is the quietest in its category and has advanced communications and enhanced soft lighting for passengers designed to reduce jet lag. The cabin air is filtered to remove almost all dust particles

About the Airbus A330 family of airliners

The Airbus A330 is a twin-aisle airliner that was first introduced in 1994. Since then, it has become one of the most popular airliners in the world, with over 1,700 A330s delivered to 120 airlines across the globe. The A330 is available in a variety of different configurations, making it well-suited for both short and long-haul flights.

The A330 is powered by two turbofan engines (General Electric CF6-80E, Pratt & Whitney PW4000, or Rolls-Royce Trent 700). Its range varies according to each type due to the variations in seating arrangements and fuel capacity.

A330neo

The A330 has been continuously updated since its introduction, and the latest version, the A330neo, made its maiden flight in 2017. neo stands for new engine option as opposed to ceo which means current engine option.

The A330neo features stretched wings with new winglets, Rolls Royce Trent 7000 engines, and increased fuel efficiency.

With its timeless design and proven reliability, the Airbus A330 is sure to continue being a popular choice for airlines for many years to come.

Pilot Conversion

Pilots who are type rated to fly the Airbus A320 can convert to the A330 with only 7 days of training. Those who are already typed rated for the A330 can covert to the A330neo with just half a day’s training.

Airbus A330 Seating Plan

The Airbus A330-200 is a twin-engine, wide-body aircraft typically configured with three classes of service and sometimes with four.

For example:

  • The economy class cabin is usually arranged in a 2-4-2 configuration, with each seat measuring 18 inches in width.
  • The premium economy class cabin typically has 2- seating, with seats that are 18.5 inches wide.
  • The first class is typically arranged in a 1-2-1 configuration, with seats that are 19.7 inches wide.

The seat width may vary with other airlines so check the airline website for full details.

Depending on the airline and type, the seating classes may be:

  • Business, Economy
  • Business, Premium Economy, Economy
  • First, Premium Economy, Economy
  • First, Business, Premium Economy, Economy

You might see these denoted in seat maps in this numeric format: 34-0-21-168 (example) in which there are 34 First, 0 Business, 21, Premium, and 168 Economy seats.

Delta A330 200 Seat Map

If we take Delta’s fleet as an example, which contains eleven A330-200s (as of 2022). The A330-200 4 class (3M2) has the four classes arranged in this way; 34-21-24-144.

At first glance the Business Class seats could be mistaken for Premium Economy seats but they are in fact in three rows behind the First Class in the main cabin.

The colour coding is fairly self explanatory; green denotes the best seat, amber have a few drawbacks, red have more disadvantages, and grey are neutral, but these are only a guide. There are many other variables on a flight that make it anything from an enjoyable experience or a stressful disappointment. A ‘red’ seat may the better option if there is an infant that can’t sleep in the ‘green’ seats.

There are about 600 Airbus A330-200s in operation around the world. Their main competition is the Boeing 767-300/400ER and the 787 Dreamliner. Another fun fact about this aircraft is that they cost in excess of £240,000,000 each.

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Ben

My first flight was in a Bell 47-D helicopter in 1966. I gained a PPL in 1991, a Permission for Aerial Work (PfAW) with a drone in 2013, and a City & Guilds in Aviation Studies in 1990. Some of the links in my blog posts are affiliate links. If you click on these links and make a purchase I may earn a small commission. It makes not difference to the price you pay. For full details, please visit the Disclaimer & Disclosure page

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