Britain in Lockdown – The End of the Beginning

My Britain in Lockdown posts fizzled out once the days started to blend into each other and the experience became routine. I managed little more than a month of daily posts before I simply forgot to add an update one day and thereby broke the continuity.

Lockdown began on March 23rd. Now, in the third week of May, nearly two months later, the restrictions are relaxed but the tensions are changing. At first we were startled by the unknown, full of questions, and at the very least concerned. Some were panicked and remain fearful to this day, but most took a more pragmatic approach and just got on with it.

The death toll is now between 35 and 40,000, depending on who you believe and how you count the deaths, and that is one of the most contentious issues. The daily figure and the graphs can lead to more gloom or be a reason for hope. People admit that countries count their dead in different ways, and yet everyone (including me) has been looking at and quoting from Worldometers.info as if it’s an accurate comparison.

Good Hygiene, Good Manners

Britain in Lockdown – Consequences

Our economy has been given a devastating blow from which it’s going to take years to recover. The government has borrowed and spent billions of pounds. Unemployment has shot up and will continue to rise. The blame and recriminations are well under way.

Utlimately the buck stops with the government and within the government it stops with Boris Johnson but he and his cabinet simply listened to the advice of the expert scientists and took appropriate measures accordingly. Any other government would have done the same.

After all, we’re constantly being told that ‘most scientists agree that there’s a climate emergency‘ and this argument is being used for all kinds of changes, restrictions, and new taxes.

Well, the scientists (virologists, epidemiologists, doctors, professors, Public Health England etc) told us the what, how, why, when, and where of the Coronavirus. The results of the actions taken on their advice are plain for all to see.

The daily use of the word ‘unprecedented‘ has reach an all time high in the past eight weeks. The phrases and the opening lines and closing wishes of emails have become trite and meaningless.

What’s the point in staying safe if in doing so life loses all its meaning?

What’s the point in staying at home if by doing so we destroy our economy and spend a decade crawling back up a steep slope of recovery?

We have to accept the fact that the Covid-19 illness is here to stay and add it to the long list of other risks that are part and parcel of everyday life. We can of course take measures to mitigate this risk but they are the same measures who should be taking for many other risks, so we don’t have to invent new ones, just live better lives.

We can start by:

  1. Maintain a high standard of hygiene. Keeping up the habit of washing hands first thing after visting shops and travelling on public transport. There were thousands of bugs on those handles and rails before the Coronavirus got added to the list.
  2. Lose weight and get fit. Obese people who are diabetic are far more at risk of dying of Covid-19.
  3. Eat nutritious food. As you strengthen the immune system it’s better able to fight back against all kinds of viruses.
  4. Be good mannered. Cough and sneeze into a handkerchief or tissues. If you can’t reach one in time, use your elbow.