5 Relationship Tips To Prevent Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome

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Aviation induced divorce syndrome (AIDS) is a term that has been coined to describe the impact of long-term air travel on marriages

The stress of long-term air travel can take its toll on even the strongest relationships, and many couples find that their marriages cannot withstand the strain

There are, however, a few things you can do to help keep your relationship strong while you’re away from home for extended periods. Here are five tips to help you maintain a healthy relationship while you’re living in a world of airports and jet lag.

According to some divorce lawyers, aviation professionals, flight crew, and their co workers in the travel industry have higher divorce rates than other professions. And, that’s understandable. When your schedule is insane when you’re jet-lagged and all over the map, no one, not even yourself, can keep pace.

You start missing on important family events; you are never home for Christmas, and you are always too tired to get out. Naturally, things tend to get a bit more complicated when you can’t be as involved as your partner wishes.

So, how can you maintain a healthy relationship if you work in the travel industry? Here are some helpful tips.

1. Take Advantage of the Positive Aspects of Your Schedule

I know, saying there’s anything positive about a hectic schedule sounds a bit crazy. There will be lots of moments, such as working on New Year’s Eve or on your partner’s birthday when it feels as if you married your work instead of your spouse. But, there’s a light at the end of the tunnel.

Every work schedule has its pros and cons. Make an effort to turn your schedule into something positive to help your relationships. For instance, if your afternoons are free, plan a nice, relaxing brunch with your loved one. Or, if you get two or three days off after a 12 hours shift, plan something nice with your partner. That can be a great way to improve your relationship.

2. Communication Is Key

Communication is by far the most important part of any relationship, but it’s especially important when you work in aviation. During flights, you can’t be reached, and when you are on the ground, you may be in a different time zone. These challenges can make it difficult for relationships to work.

Make a habit of letting your partner know where you will be staying, which flight you are working on, what are your plans for the day, and so on. That way, there won’t be any place for questions or insecurities.

3. Address Problems Head On

When your schedule is crazy, you tend to ignore minor problems at home. But, the most trivial matters, such as your partner’s altercation with a coworker or getting the car’s oil changed, can quickly turn into fights.

Don’t assume that just because you don’t have a regular 9-to-5 job, your partner will take care of everything for you. Discuss every problem with your spouse and let her or him know that you are willing to be involved in the home chores.

4. Allow Yourself Time Off

With your hectic schedule, your loved one rarely gets the time to see you. So, when you have a day off, they assume that you will spend it together. That could be a nice way to relax, but having to meet your partner’s expectations every time can become stressful.

Let your loved one know that you need time to rest, especially after a hard shift when you are jet-lagged. Allow your body to recover and readjust to your time zone before making any plans. In fact, you should be planning big events only for the days when you are likely to be rested, relaxed, and in a good mood.

5. Phone Home

With today’s technology, there is no excuse not to connect with your loved ones regularly. Even if you are in a different time zone, and you can’t call home, you can still send a message letting your loved one know you’re OK. Many people find this reassuring, especially if you get into the habit of sending a message every time you arrive at your destination.

If you are lucky enough to be in a relationship with someone in the aviation industry, take advantage of the perks that come with it. Get on a plane and see the world together. For the rest of you, be patient, stay healthy, and follow these tips. Things will work in your favour, eventually. 

Pilots Divorce Rate

In the airline industry, divorce rate among pilots and flight attendants is higher than average. The reasons for this are many and varied, but some experts suggest that the high stress levels and long hours associated with the job may contribute to marital problems.

Another factor is the fact that pilots and flight attendants often spend extended periods of time away from home, which can put a strain on even the strongest relationships.

Whatever the cause, it’s clear that the airline industry has a divorce problem. Fortunately, there are some steps that both airlines and employees can take to try to address this issue.

For example, airlines could provide more support for employees who are going through a divorce, and employees could be encouraged to communicate more with their spouses about their work schedules and stress levels.

With a little effort, it may be possible to reduce the high divorce rate among pilots and flight attendants.

Preventing Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome

It can be difficult to maintain a healthy relationship when one partner works in the travel industry. The strain on family life is a real risk. Misplaced priorities can lead to neglect in other areas. However, by following these five tips, you can help your relationship thrive.

Communication is key, so make sure to keep your partner updated on your whereabouts and schedule. Address problems head-on, and try not to ignore any issues that may arise. Allow yourself some time off from your partner, and connect with her or him regularly through technology.

And finally, enjoy the perks that come with being in a relationship with someone in the aviation industry!

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The Best Airline to Work For: What to Look for in an Airline Employer

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The best airline to work for depends on what it’s measured against. All kinds of criteria could be used; pay and conditions, training, prospects, routes, aircraft, perks, etc. It depends on where it is in the world and how all of this relates to you, the employee.

Location and size also play their part in deciding. A small, regional airline may be able to focus more on you and a particular stage in your career as opposed to a major airline.

It also depends on your job role. Most people seeking this type of information are pilots and flight attendants but airlines employ all kinds of people. It may be the case the employee benefits for flight attendants are good but not as attractive for those in ground based roles.

Employee Benefits

When considering a job with an airline, find out what they offer for each of these:

  • Starting salary and pay scale. What will be your starting salary and what could you hope to be earning in five years time?
  • Paid time. Will you be paid from the moment you arrive at work or are there other strict criteria for the start and end times of your shift?
  • Job security. Research the airline’s track record for hiring and laying off staff. Also, think about your own motivation and career path. Do you regard this airline as a stepping stone to another?
  • Paid training. Will you be given training not just at the start of the employment but as time goes on? Flight attendant training is often used as a screening process and not everyone will make the grade. After several days of various physical and mental tests some candidates may have to shelve their dream to become a flight attendant, at least for a while.
  • Retirement plans. What is their pension policy and when is lowest age at which you could retire? Would they allow you to continue working if you wanted to?
  • Air travel. Does the job entitle you to employee discounts for air travel? Does this perk extend to members of your family and to your friends? Does this perk end when you retire?
  • Layover allowance. What does the airline company offer for the time you spend in a hotel until you are called for your return flight? This is a very important point for air crew members and cabin crew who may have to stay in a hotel for several nights.
  • Profit sharing. Many airlines offer profit sharing as one of their employee benefits. There may be eligibility criteria e.g. a minimum length of service, so this may not be something a new flight attendant can take advantage of but in time it could be a significant perk.
  • Health insurance. Is this part of the package of employee benefits? This can be particularly significant for flight attendants. Aside from the day to day risks of accidents and injury in a closed environment there have also be some reports of health problems caused by the chemicals in flight attendant uniforms and the quality of the cabin air.
  • Flexible schedule. Pilots and flight attendants will inevitably have to work shifts but check to see if your airline offers a flexible schedule that gives you time off for important dates in your family life. This isn’t always important but for you personally, depending on your time of life, it could be a huge deal.
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Average Flight Attendant Pay Scale

Average pay for flight attendants is based on a number of factors, including experience, location, and the type of airline. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for flight attendants was $62,280 in 2021. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $37,020, while the highest 10 percent earned more than $81,400.

So, while the most senior flight attendants earn in excess of $80k pa and into six figures it takes a considerable number of years to reach that level. It’s often assumed that the highest paid flight attendants earn more than that in the world of VIP private jet flying but this is by no means the case. Flight attendants can earn as much money in most airlines if they manage their careers correctly.

However, the perks for flight attendants aboard bizjets are sometimes what attracts applicants who compete for flight attendant jobs in the corporate jet world.

Experienced Flight Attendants

Experience is one of the biggest factors affecting the pay that fight attenants earn. Many experience flight attendants will remain loyal to their airline if their years of service are reflected in their salaries.

Location is also a significant factor. Flight attendants based in New York and Los Angeles generally earn higher salaries than those based in smaller cities.

Finally, the type of airline can affect pay. Major airlines typically offer higher salaries and more generous benefits than regional or budget airlines. Consequently, flight attendants at major airlines tend to earn higher salaries on average.

As you embark on your flight attendant career, bear in mind that if it doesn’t work out with your first airline then you can move on later.

FAQs

What is the hardest airline to get a job with?

It’s not easy to get a job with an airline. Airlines typically have very high standards and are looking for the best of the best. In order to be successful in airline recruitment, you need to have the perfect mix of qualifications, aptitude, and personality. Airlines receive thousands of applications for just a few open positions, so it’s essential that you stand out from the crowd.

The most popular airline among airline employees is Southwest Airlines. This airline is known for its great pay and benefits, as well as its friendly and fun work environment. Southwest employees enjoy working for a company that values them and shows it through its policies and practices.

What airlines have the best benefits for employees?

Many airlines offer great benefits packages to their employees, including healthcare, dental and vision insurance, 401(k) plans, and paid time off.

Some airlines go above and beyond with their benefits offerings, providing employees with airline tickets, discounts on products and services, and even memberships to airline-specific credit unions.

Employees of airlines also enjoy perks such as free or discounted travel on the airline, as well as access to airport lounges and other exclusive areas.

So, when it comes to finding an airline with great benefits for employees, there are many options to choose from. It really depends on what is most important to you in an employer.

Who is better to work for Delta or American Airlines?

There is no easy answer when it comes to deciding which airline is better to work for – Delta or American Airlines. Both airlines are highly respected and offer great pay and benefits packages to their employees.

Delta Airline is known for its strong focus on employee training and development, while American Airlines is praised for its family-friendly policies. It really depends on your individual preferences and priorities as to which airline would be a better fit for you.

What are the best airlines for flight attendants?

Flight attendants play a vital role in the airline industry, and airlines know this. As a result, many airlines offer great benefits and perks to their flight attendant employees.

Some of the best airlines for flight attendants include Southwest Airlines, JetBlue Airways, and American Airlines. These airlines are known for providing their employees with generous pay and benefits, as well as opportunities for career advancement.

Additionally, these airlines offer their flight attendants a number of perks, such as free or discounted travel.

Which international airline has the highest paid flight attendants?

According to PayScale, the highest paid flight attendants work for Singapore Airlines. This is likely due to the airline’s strong international reputation and high standards of service. Cathay Pacific Airways comes in second, and flight attendants at Delta Airlines earn the third highest salaries.

While salary is certainly an important factor to consider when looking for an airline employer, it’s not the only thing that matters. Employees should also look at factors such as job satisfaction, company culture, and opportunities for career advancement. For example, Virgin Atlantic has a reputation for being a fun and friendly airline to work for, while Emirates is known for its excellent benefits and compensation package.

What is the number 1 airline in the world?

According to the airline rating organization Skytrax, Emirates ranks as the number one airline in the world. The Dubai-based airline has won numerous awards for its exceptional service and passenger experience, and it continues to grow in popularity year after year.

In second place is Singapore Airlines, followed by Cathay Pacific Airways in third. As these airlines continue to set the bar high, it will be interesting to see how other airlines measure up in the coming years.

Which domestic airline (USA) pays highest salary to cabin crew?

Delta Airlines is the highest paying for cabin crew in the United States. They offer a very competitive salary and benefits package that is hard to beat. Other airlines, such as American Airlines and United Airlines, also offer good pay and benefits, but Delta usually comes out on top.

Delta Airlines offers the best pay and benefits for cabin crew in the United States. Other airlines, such as American Airlines and United Airlines, also offer good pay and benefits, but Delta usually comes out on top. If you are looking for an airline to work for, Delta is a great option.

Another important factor to consider when looking for an airline to work for is the airline’s reputation. Some airlines have a better reputation than others when it comes to looking after their employees. Delta Airlines has a great reputation for looking after its employees. If you are looking for one of the best airlines to work for, Delta is a great option.

What do flight attendants do?

Flight attendants are responsible for the safety and comfort of passengers on commercial flights. They greet passengers, help them to find their seats, and answer any questions they may have. As the aircraft taxis to the hold for take off, they provide passengers with information about safety procedures and emergency equipment.

During the flightethey offer refreshments and deal with any problems that may arise. These can be minor or mundane problems but occassionally they can be medical incidents that require first aid.

In order to become a flight attendant, individuals must complete a training program that is approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. The training includes instruction in emergency procedures, first aid, customer service, and other topics. After successfully completing the training program, flight attendants must take an exam in order to obtain their certification i.e. their ‘wings’.

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How to become a bush pilot flying in remote areas and rough terrain

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If you have ever wondered how to become a bush pilot then this post will give you some pointers. Bush pilots are responsible for flying into and out of remote areas, often transporting cargo or passengers. They are pilots skilled in STOL operating in and out of short strips. They fly airplanes equipped with floats, tundra wheels, and skis.

This type of aviation occurs all over the world. Bush pilots fly in places like Canada, Alaska, Central & South America, Africa, South East Asia, and Australasia.

To become a bush pilot, you’ll need to have a commercial pilots license and a lot of additional training and experience. Aspiring bush pilots need to learn precision flying. You’ll also need to be comfortable with long periods of solitude, as such pilots often fly for hours at a time without seeing another person.

The training that the aspirant bush pilot will need will depend on the terrain in which he or she intends to operate. You may need to train with several flight schools to complete all the required training for flying in remote locations.

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What is a bush pilot and what do they do

A bush pilot is someone who flies aircraft in wilderness areas, often in support of resource extraction operations such as mining, forestry, and fishing. They may also fly tourists into wilderness areas and ferry passengers when overland travel is not possible.

Many bush pilots are freelance and work on a contract basis. Some work for larger companies that operate in remote locations.

Bush piloting typically involves flying smaller aircraft, such as single-engine planes and helicopters. They must be able to land on short airstrips and in other challenging locations. Consequently, the job has some additional risks that include rapidly changing weather and abnormal conditions.

Despite the risks, these pilots are essential to the operations of many businesses in remote areas. They provide a vital service that would otherwise be unavailable.

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How to become a bush pilot

Bush pilots are a special breed of aviators. They must be skilled in flying in difficult conditions, and they must be able to think on their feet. They fly into areas that conventional pilots regard impossible, or at least too dangerous to risk.

The first thing you need is aviation experience. You should have a few thousand hours of flying time under your belt before you even think about becoming a bush pilot. This is not the type of flying you can do just after you’ve obtained a private pilots license.

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You also need to have a good knowledge of survival skills. This is because if something goes wrong when you’re flying over a wilderness area, you may not be able to get help right away. You need to be able to build a fire, purify water, and find food in the wild.

Lastly, you need to have a good mental attitude. A bush pilot must be able to deal with stressful situations and they must be able to stay calm under pressure. Conventional flying involves a higher degree of predictability. There is near-constant radio contact and plenty of opportunities for forced landings. Bush flying on the other hand can be the exact opposite and therefore a bush pilot needs to be resilient and self-reliant.

The skills and experience you need to be a bush pilot

So what skills and experience do you need to be a bush pilot? Well, you need to be able to fly a plane, but you also need to be familiar with the terrain and weather conditions in the area where you’ll be flying. You need to be able to navigate your way through dense forests and over rugged mountains, and you need to be able to land on short airstrips.

To prepare for bush flying you’ll need to devise a training program that will meet your specific requirements and for most this will include some time that will cover mountain flying. Your advanced bush pilot course is likely to include several on this list:

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  • Tailwheel conversion
  • Mountain flying
  • Sea plane rating or sea plane refresher course
  • Ski plane experience
  • River landings e.g. on gravel bars
  • Landing on frozen lakes
  • Glacier landing training
  • STOL flying with unconventional types e.g. tundra tires
  • Survival skills
  • Organisational skills
  • Basic mechanics & maintenance

You need to have a good knowledge of survival skills. If you’re forced to land miles away from the nearest help you’ll need to be able to build a fire, purify water, and find food in the wild. You will also need to know how to protect yourself and your passengers from predatory animals e.g. bears.

Lastly, you need to have a good attitude. Bush pilots must be able to deal with stressful situations and they must be able to stay calm under pressure. If you’re not sure if you have what it takes to prepare for bush flying, many flight schools offer training.

Why people become bush pilots

Bush pilots are an important part of the aviation community. They provide essential services to people and businesses in areas that are not easily accessible by other means of transportation.

There are many reasons why people become bush pilots. For some, it’s because they love flying and want to experience new places and cultures. Others want to help people in need, such as during natural disasters. Still, others become bush pilots because they want to start their own business or transportation service. Whatever the reason, bush pilots play an important role in the aviation community.

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There are a few things that all bush pilots have in common. They are all passionate about flying, and they all have a strong desire to help others. They also have a high level of skill and experience. Most bush pilots have years of flying experience, and many have flown in some of the most remote and challenging areas of the world.

Where to start

If you’re wondering what to do after you’ve obtained a private pilots license then bush flying is one option, even if you don’t intend to do so commercially. You’re going to need at least a PPL, a tailwheel rating, and a lot of PIC time in your logbook. On the other hand, you may want to obtain a commerical pilots license first if you intend to fly professionally as a bush pilot. Find yourself a certified instructor at a qualified flight school who can teach you the basics of flying into (and out of!) a remote area and how to make quick decisions in abnormal conditions.

Yyou’ll need a flight school that will teach you some of the above mentioned ratings and gain some flight experience in off airport conditions. Log hours on floats and several aircraft types. If you can do all that then you’ll be ready to apply for an entry level position or at least fly confidently into a remote location for your own enjoyment.

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Aviation Jobs in Airports and Airlines

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When it comes to aviation jobs, the sky is not the limit. As the old saying goes, the sky is home. Here is a list with short descriptions of many opportunities for employment within the aviation industry. Which of these attracts you?

Jobs with Airlines

There are all kinds of job roles within the airlines. Most people tend to think no further than the flight and cabin crews but of course, there are all the roles you would expect in any large company, from HR to IT, from Sales & Marketing to Project Management.

Aircraft Maintenance Technician

An aircraft maintenance technician is responsible for inspecting, maintaining, and repairing the various parts and systems that make up an aircraft. They work on everything from the engines and wings to the landing gear and tail. The job can be challenging, but it’s also very rewarding when everything is working properly and the aircraft takes off safely.

Aircraft maintenance technicians typically have a high school diploma or equivalent, although some may have an associate’s degree in aviation maintenance technology. They can expect to earn a salary of around $50,000 per year.

Airline Administrator

Airline administrative support personnel are the backbone of the airline industry. They keep the airline running smoothly and efficiently behind the scenes. This important role is responsible for a wide range of activities, from answering customer inquiries to preparing flight paperwork. Airline administrative support personnel are essential to a successful airline operation.

If you are interested in a career in the aviation industry, airline administrative support may be a good fit for you. This position requires excellent customer service skills, as well as strong organizational and problem-solving abilities. It is a challenging but rewarding career, and there are many opportunities for advancement within the airline industry.

Airline Attorney

Airline attorneys are responsible for ensuring that an airline is in compliance with all federal and state laws. They also provide legal advice to the airline’s management and employees, represent the airline in civil litigation, and negotiate and draft contracts.

Airline attorneys must have a law degree from an accredited law school, be licensed to practice law in the state where the airline is based, and have several years of experience in aviation law. They should also be familiar with the UK Civil Aviation Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) regulations governing airlines.

Airline attorneys typically work for large airlines or law firms that specialize in aviation law. They may work full-time or part-time, and may be required to travel.

Airline Manager

Airline managers are responsible for the overall operation of an airline. They develop and implement policies and procedures, direct and manage staff, and oversee financial operations. To be successful in this role, it is important to have strong leadership skills and be able to make decisions quickly. Airline managers typically have a college degree in business or aviation, and they can expect to earn a salary of around $85,000 per year.

Airline Passenger Assistant

Airline passenger assistants are responsible for helping passengers with boarding and deplaning, as well as providing general assistance to passengers. Passenger assistants must be able to work quickly and efficiently, and they need to have excellent people skills. They also need to be able to handle difficult situations calmly and effectively. A college degree is not typically required for this position, but it is helpful to have some customer service or aviation experience.

Airline Pilot

Airline pilots are responsible for the safe transportation of passengers and cargo. They must ensure that all safety procedures are followed, and they must be able to handle any emergency that may arise. In addition, airline pilots must be able to navigate their aircraft through all weather conditions. They must also be able to communicate effectively with air traffic control and with the cabin crew.

Airline pilots can earn very high salaries later in their careers. However, the salaries can be surprisingly low for junior First Officers. It all depends on the airline. In addition, pilots can receive excellent benefits, including health insurance and generous retirement packages.

Airline Ramp Agent

Airline ramp agents are responsible for the safety and security of passengers and cargo on an aircraft. They also help to load and unload baggage and cargo, as well as direct planes on the ground. This is a very important role in the aviation industry, and airline ramp agents must be able to work quickly and efficiently to get planes boarded and off the ground safely. A college degree is not typically required for this position, but it is helpful to have some experience in customer service or aviation.

Airline Regional Sales Manager

Airline Regional Sales Managers are responsible for developing and maintaining relationships with key clients in their region. They work with airline executives to create sales plans and identify new growth opportunities. They must be able to build strong relationships with clients and be able to negotiate favorable contracts. If you have a passion for selling and see yourself in the aviation industry and want a career that will keep you on your toes, consider becoming an Airline Regional Sales Manager.

Airline Reservations Sales Agent

Airline reservation sales agents are the front line of customer service for airlines. They are responsible for helping passengers book flights, reserve seats, and make changes to their reservations. They also handle customer complaints and provide assistance as needed. The role of airline reservation sales agent can be a challenging but rewarding one. It is a great opportunity for young people who are interested in travel and customer service.

Airline Ticket Agent

Airline ticket agents are responsible for a wide variety of tasks, such as issuing tickets, checking in passengers, and handling baggage. They must be able to work quickly and efficiently, and they need to have excellent customer service skills. A college degree is not typically required for this position, but it is helpful to have some customer service or aviation experience. Airline ticket agents can expect to earn a salary of around $35,000 per year.

Avionics Technician

Avionics Technicians are responsible for the installation and maintenance of avionics equipment in aircraft. They must be able to read blueprints and schematic diagrams, as well as have a working knowledge of electronics and computers. Avionics Technicians typically work for airlines, aircraft manufacturers, or maintenance companies.

The role of an Avionics Technician is to maintain and install communication, navigation, and surveillance equipment on aircraft. They must be able to read blueprints and schematic diagrams, as well as have a good understanding of electronics and computers. Avionics Technicians typically work for airlines, aircraft manufacturers, or maintenance companies.

Crew Schedule Coordinator

A Crew Schedule Coordinator is responsible for creating, maintaining, and managing the crew schedules for an airline. They work with the pilots, flight attendants, and other airline staff to ensure that all flights are staffed with the necessary personnel and that all crew members are properly rested and meet all regulatory requirements. This is a critical role in ensuring that flights operate safely and on time.

Flight Attendant

Flight attendants play a crucial role in ensuring the safety of passengers on board an aircraft. They are responsible for performing a wide variety of tasks, from providing customer service to overseeing the safety of the cabin. To be a successful flight attendant, it is important to have strong customer service skills and be able to handle stress effectively.

The median annual salary for flight attendants is $50,500. However, salaries can vary significantly depending on the airline company and the level of experience. Entry-level flight attendants typically earn around $35,000 per year, while those with more experience can earn up to $75,000 per year.

Most airlines offer benefits packages that include medical and dental insurance, paid vacation, and 401(k) plans. Some airlines also offer sign-on bonuses and other incentives.

Flight Instructor

Airline Flight Instructors are responsible for inducting recently qualified pilots into the airline and ensuring that pilots maintain the high standards of flying required. They have to ensure that the pilots are sufficiently skilled to fly the various aircraft types and that they have all the recency requirements for them. Flight Instructors are often recruited from the most senior pilots who have demonstrated their abilities during many years of flying.

Human Resources Manager

As a human resources manager for an airline, you would be responsible for overseeing the hiring process, managing employee files and benefits, and ensuring compliance with labor laws. This is a challenging and rewarding career that requires excellent organizational skills, attention to detail, and the ability to handle difficult conversations.

Information Technology Specialist

Airline Information Technology Specialists are responsible for managing the technology that keeps airline operations running smoothly. They work with computers and software to track flights, monitor baggage and cargo, and manage reservations and other customer data. This is a critical role because without a strong and stable IT infrastructure the airline would be vulnerable to not only flight delays and loss of business but also cyber attack.

Jobs at Airports

Unless they are wearing the uniform of a particular airline, all the people you see working at an airport are employed by the airport itself, employed by one of the companies with a concession at the airport, or they are contractors.

Airport Baggage Handler

As a baggage handler, your responsibilities will include loading and unloading baggage onto and from aircraft, as well as moving luggage around the airport. This is a critical role in ensuring that passengers have a smooth and enjoyable travel experience.

The work can be physically demanding, but it’s also very rewarding. You’ll be working as part of a team and you’ll be responsible for the security and safety of passenger belongings. Shift work is likely and overtime is a distinct possibility.

Airport Operations Agents

Airport Operations Agents are the front-line staff of an airport. They are responsible for the safety and security of passengers, baggage, and cargo. They must also ensure that all flights are running on schedule. The role of an Airport Operations Agent can be extremely demanding, but it is also very rewarding.

The skills that an Airport Operations Agent needs to succeed include customer service skills, problem-solving skills, attention to detail, communication skills, teamwork skills, and time management skills.

Aircraft Refuelers

Aircraft refuelers are responsible for the safe and efficient fueling of aircraft. They must be able to work quickly and accurately to minimize delays. Aircraft fuelers must also be able to work safely with hazardous materials. The role of an aircraft refueler is important for keeping flights on schedule and ensuring the safety of passengers and crew. The work can be physically demanding and you’ll be working outside in all weathers.

Airport Equipment Driver

They may also be responsible for maintaining the supplies and equipment. This is a great opportunity for young job seekers who are looking for a career that offers a lot of variety. The Airport Equipment Driver is responsible for ensuring that all the supplies and equipment are delivered to the correct location and that they are in good condition when they arrive. This is a very important position at the airport, and the Airport Equipment Driver must be reliable and efficient. If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding career, then this may be the perfect opportunity for you.

Airport Fire Fighter

Airport firefighters are responsible for the safety of passengers, crew, and aircraft during a fire emergency. They work in the airport terminal and on the tarmac, where they extinguish fires, rescue passengers and crew, and provide emergency medical care.

Airport firefighters must be able to think quickly and decisively in emergencies, and they must be able to work as part of a team. They also need to be able to communicate effectively with other airport personnel, passengers, and the media.

Airport firefighters typically have at least two years of experience in firefighting before they are hired by an airport. They may also have certification as emergency medical technicians (EMTs).

The work can be dangerous, and airport firefighters must be prepared to face a wide variety of emergencies, including fires, chemical spills, and aircraft accidents. They also must be prepared to work long hours, often in difficult and hazardous conditions.

Airport Vehicle Mechanic

Working as an airport vehicle mechanic is a great way to get started in the aviation industry. These mechanics are responsible for inspecting, repairing, and maintaining the vehicles that are used on airport property. They must be able to work quickly and efficiently to keep the airport running smoothly.

This is a great career for young people who are interested in aviation and want to learn about the inner workings of an airport. It is also a great way to get started in the aviation industry, as mechanics can often move up to more specialized positions with experience.

If you are interested in working as an airport vehicle mechanic, you should have a strong interest in mechanics and engines, and you should be able to work independently. You should also be able to follow safety procedures and regulations.

Aviation Meteorologist

Aspiring Aviation Meteorologists play a critical role in ensuring the safety of both passengers and crew. They use their knowledge of the weather to provide real-time updates to pilots, air traffic controllers, and other ground personnel. This information helps them to make informed decisions about things like whether or not to delay or divert a flight and whether or not an airport can remain open in extreme weather conditions.

Flight Dispatcher

A Flight Dispatcher is responsible for overseeing the entire flight operation and ensuring that all aspects of the flight are in accordance with regulations. They work with pilots, air traffic controllers, and other airline personnel to ensure that flights depart and arrive on schedule.

The role of a Flight Dispatcher is essential to the safety of passengers and crew. They are responsible for the coordination of all ground operations related to a flight, including loading and unloading baggage and cargo, fueling the aircraft, and arranging catering.

Flight Dispatchers must be able to work under pressure in a fast-paced environment. They must have a good understanding of aviation regulations and be able to make quick decisions

Aviation Job Search

Many jobs in the aviation industry are advertised through the usual job site portals online but sometimes you can get lucky. Search for ‘aviation jobs near me‘ and you might find locally advertised vacancies that haven’t yet made it onto the mainstream sites.

Search jobs in specific areas or niches of the aviation industry. Vary your search terms and keep a note of them for repeating the searches on a regular basis.

Requirements for Employment

Job hunting in the aviation industry can be competitive. Every day, new vacancies attract a lot of applicants so your standards and qualifications need to be high. While it may be possible to find entry level positions among ground staff roles with just a high school diploma, most jobs in the air require a lot more than that.

When it comes to characteristics things have changed beyond recognition from the days when a would-be flight attendant would be asked her marital status. Today, as airlines like Virgin Atlantic have reminded us in their adverts, your gender identity and sexual orienation are of no consequence. If fact, they encourage a diverse cross section within their employees. However, other airlines in more conservative countries like those in the Middle East still seem to high mostly women for flight attendant roles.

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Flight Dispatcher – Aircraft Operations

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In this post I’m going to describe the role of the Aircraft or Flight Dispatcher. You may also see this role described as the Airline Dispatcher or Flight Operations Officer, among other titles.

Every commercial aircraft that takes off from an airport requires a team of people who ensure its departure is safe and on time. As well as the engineers who may have serviced the aircraft, the ground operations teams who load the cargo or passenger luggage, the cabin and air crew, there are the Flight Dispatchers. The Flight Dispatchers are responsible for coordinating all the services and preparations required to ensure an aircraft leaves on schedule.

They start their day with a thorough examination of the current weather and the forecast for all their aircraft routes and destinations. They check the route for the intended flight and make any adjustments to it, having taken into account weather conditions en route or at the destination, and the operational status of airports. For this reason, Flight Dispatchers need to be able to confidently interpret weather data, NOTAMs, and other forms of information relating to aircraft in flight.

Flight Dispatchers spend a lot of time communicating with colleagues on the ground, at the airport, and the flight crews aboard the aircraft. They arrange for the cleaning of passenger aircraft and the loading of cargo aircraft. They arrange for the refuelling, routine maintenance checks, and any ad hoc servicing that may be required on the aircraft.

When you’re waiting in Departures to board your aircraft, it is the Flight Dispatcher who gives the green light for the gate to be opened for passenger boarding. It is the Flight Dispatcher who informs the air crew of the total weight of all cargo, luggage, and passengers. This is crucial information that needs to be accurate to ensure safe take off, flight, and landing.

The correct loading of an aircraft of any size, whether it’s a single engine trainer or a four engine airliner, has to take into account the weight of the fuel, the luggage & cargo, and the passengers & crew. These weight and balance calculations ensure that the aircraft can take off, fly, and land safely, taking into account no only the limitations of the aircraft but also the altitude of the airport, the prevailing weather conditions, and the length of the runway at both the point of departure and at the destination.

What skills do I need to become a Flight Dispatcher?

If this is a career that interests you then you’ll need to have good communication skills, both written and spoken. You should be confident in using IT systems and be able to learn and adapt to programs and utility software specific to the role. A basic understanding of airport operations and aircraft types is obviously a good start. A knowledge of hazardous goods, and health and safety procedures is also important for the role.

Flight Dispatchers are usually expected to work shifts in order to cover aircraft arrivals and departures around the clock. The job can also be physically demanding as you may be expected to spend some of your time outdoors in all weathers as you liaise with staff airside, around aircraft, and elsewhere on the airport apron.

Time management, resource planning, decision making, and additional language skills are all useful for this role. However, some of these skills can be developed with on the job training.

You may have acquired college certificates demonstrating some basic knowledge, for example, the City and Guilds Aviation Operations on the Ground (4877) or similar credentials that shows a basic aptitude pertaining to airport operations.

Starting salaries for inexperienced flight dispatchers in the UK are under £20,000 per year but can quickly rise depending on the size of the airport and the candidates abilities and experience. If you have an interest in aviation and want to work around aircraft then this job might be the ideal choice.

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What Do Airline Pilots Do?

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The answer to the question ‘What do airline pilots do?‘ may seem obvious. They fly the aircraft and post selfies on Instagram. That’s right, isn’t it? Well, there’s a little more to it than that.

For a start, any pilot is part of a crew, usually of two on short haul routes. There will be a Captain, the senior pilot who has overall responsibility for the flight. The Captain’s responsibilities include not only the practicalities of the flight itself but also the safety of all crew and passengers.

He or she will be supported by a First Officer, a less experienced pilot. They will share the flying duties in order to give each other rest breaks. Long haul flights may have three or even four pilots aboard.

Duties & Responsibilities

All pilots will be familiar with the processes required to carry out the following pre and post flight checks:

  • Gathering all information about the aircraft, the crew, the passengers or cargo, and the weather both en route and at the destination airport.
  • Create a flight plan based on that information and calculate the correct altitude and fuel required for the flight.
  • Supervise the loading of the fuel and ensure the operation of the aircraft maximises fuel efficiency.
  • Carry out pre flight checks on all the safety systems on the aircraft.
  • Carry out pre flight checks on all the instruments and navigation systems.
  • Communicate with Air Traffic Control before the aircraft leaves the gate, during taxi, and after departure.
  • Conduct a pre flight briefing with the cabin crew.

During the briefing the Captain will summarise the flight time, gate number, taxi duration, altitude of flight, and any significant weather en route.

During The Flight Itself

  • Abide by any noise abatement procedures during departure.
  • Maintain regular contact with the cabin crew throughout the flight.
  • Make and maintain contact with the appropriate air traffic controllers en route.
  • Monitor and understand the aircraft’s navigational and control instruments.
  • Regularly check the aircraft’s performance and its position relative to the planned route.
  • Regularly check the weather for any changes and check on the location of other aircraft in the vicinity.
  • Keep the passengers informed about the progress of the flight and any deviations from the schedule.

If there are any changes in the weather or if there are any on board emergencies the flight crew will need to react quickly and efficiently.

Post Flight Procedures

  • Update the aircraft’s logbook with the hours flown and other data.
  • Compile a report about the flight itself and include any irregularities with the aircraft or any incidents that occurred.

For air crew there is about an hour of work on the ground after the flight.

Hours and Shifts

Being an airline pilot is not a 9 to 5 job and a large degree of flexibility is required. Pilots will often live within a short commute time of their base airport in case they’re needed at short notice to cover absent pilots. However, the airlines appreciate that everyone needs to be able to plan ahead and so they’ll inform their pilots on short haul routes of their shift patterns well in advance. For long haul pilots there are often single nights or perhaps a few days away from home with travel through various time zones.

There are limits to the amount of hours a pilot can fly in any day and in total throughout the year. The regulations vary around the world but for European airlines the regulations state that pilots should not fly more than:

  • 60 duty hours in any 7 consecutive days;
  • 110 duty hours in any 14 consecutive days; and
  • 190 duty hours in any 28 consecutive days, spread as evenly as practicable throughout that period.

Long haul pilots who travel through time zones will take rest breaks away from the cockpit, often in crew bunk beds.

What do airline pilots earn?

Salaries vary according to the size of the airline, the aircraft type, and the pilot’s experience. Here in the UK, a recently qualified First Officer for a small, regional airline can expect a starting salary of around £25,000 pa. Larger airlines may offer more and the salaries will eventually increase in proportion to the experience. For example, more experienced First Officers can look forward to £36,000 to £48,000 pa.

Once you’ve been promoted to Captain you can expect a salary of £57,000 to £78,000 for a medium sized airline. If your employer is one of the major operators then salaries of between £97,000 and £140,000 or more are the industry norm.

What Do Airline Pilots Do? More Information

Pilots are regularly tested to ensure they maintain the necessary skills required to fulfil all their responsibilities. They also have to maintain a Class 1 Medical certificate in order to keep their licences valid.

To find out more read our our other post, “How to become an airline pilot“.

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How to Become an Airline Pilot

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In this post we’ll try to give you a high level view of how to become an airline pilot. Think of it as the view from 36,000 feet.

While forecasters may disagree on the number of vacancies, and despite the impact on the aviation industry of a pandemic it seems highly likely that the demand for commercial pilots will continue for many years to come. If you are young, ambitious, and you have the financial backing then there are opportunities for those reaching for the sky.

You may have seen TV documentaries like the one about EasyJet in which young recruits are put through their paces in the right hand seat of the cockpit of an Airbus A320. Here they hope to demonstrate that they do have the required skills to become a permanent member of the crew. Once they have passed the final tests they can look forward to a career path that leads to the position of Captain, and perhaps one day, Instructor.

To reach this point they have gone through months of training and spent a great deal of money. Depending on the route taken and your own personal aptitude the final figure is likely to be around £100, 000 from ab initio to ‘frozen’ (f) ATPL. There are two paths you can take, the integrated and the modular route. The integrated route is the full time study method in which you fully immerse yourself in flying and study until you reach your goal about 18 months later. The big advantage of this path is the continuity of study and training.

The modular route allows candidates to study and train at their own pace. The advantage of this path is that it allows flexibility in planning and financing, with breaks in which to earn money for the next stage.

Here then is a summary of the steps taken on either path. Of course, this is only a summary that will give you a rough idea of what’s required. For the details you are strongly advised to do your own research, consult the Civil Aiviation Authority website (or equivalent for your country) , and talk to flight instructors, and of course qualified airline pilots.

As with all things in aviation the onus is on you to check the latest information, whether that is the weather, aeronautical charts, or training requirements.

First Steps To A Commercial Pilot’s Licence

The first step for any aspiring airline pilot is to pass a Class 1 CAA medical examination. There is little point in dreaming of a career in commercial aviation if you are unable to pass this essential test of your physiological condition. This is a very thorough examination that includes eyesight and hearing tests.

The next step is to obtain a Private Pilots Licence. If you have no flying experience at all then you’ll need to complete a minimum of 45 hours of training of which 5 can be on an approved flight simulator. Those 45 hours should include 25 hours of dual flight i.e. with an instructor. You will also need to include 10 hours of solo flight.

Five of these ten hours should be solo cross-country flight. One of those cross-country flights should be of at least 270 NM in total with two full stop landings at two different aerodromes to that of your departure point. This is commonly known as the Qualifying Cross Country (QXC).

Aviators with previous flying experience and perhaps existing lesser licences should check the PPL requirements with the CAA and their Chief Flying Instructor. The 45 hours is a minimum and most students will take longer than that to meet the required standards so always budget for more hours than the minimum. However long it takes you to complete all the required air training you will also need to pass all the multiple choice ground school exams.

Finally, you will need to pass the Skills Test which consists of about 90 minutes of scrutiny of your flying skills by an examiner.

After the PPL, on to the Commercial Licence

Having obtained the PPL the candidate now needs to consolidate what was learned and to expand on those new skills. This would be the ideal time to add a Night Qualification to the licence. This can be achieved after 5 hours training under instruction during the hours of darkness. Now comes the time to hour build i.e. fly more solo, navigate to other airfields, and generally gain as much experience as possible.

It’s vital at this stage to maintain the momentum and build confidence. This air time is not just about improving flying skills but also in decision making and being in every sense of the phrase the Pilot in Command.

If they’re not already there many candidates jet off to hour build in places like Florida or Australia where the skies are big, blue, and generally less congested than the grey skies of Europe. The PPL holder will need to complete about 100 hours during the hour building phase. So the budget for this will need to include not just the aircraft hire rates but accommodation, food, travel, and landing fees.

Next, the private pilot can start studying for the ATPL (Air Transport Pilot’s Licence) theory exams. There are fourteen of these, all multiple choice. The study syllabus can be completed by distant learning, or by part or full time attendance at an appropriate centre.

Onwards & Upwards

So by now you are a confident private pilot with 100 or more hours of solo time in your logbook. Your ATPL Theory exams are in the bag and things are progressing well. Your next three steps can be taken in any order.

You’ll need an Instrument Rating so that you can fly in poor weather by reference to the cockpit instruments alone. Again, this requires a substantial amount of training, 55 hours in total. As well as the cost of the training there will be other expenses such as approach and landing fees.

You will also need a Commercial Pilots Licence or CPL. To obtain this you’ll need a further minimum of 25 hours of training. This training includes learning to operate more complex aircraft with retractable undercarriage and variable pitch propellers. Once achieved you’ll be able to fly for ‘hire or reward’.

The third step is the multi-engine rating. Typically this will involve a minimum of six hours training on a light twin-engine aircraft, plus a further set of ground school exams with the inevitable hours of study and tuition.

By now you have a CPL/IR with a multi-engine and night qualification. You have a valid Class I medical and passes in all the ATPL theory exams.

Your next two tasks are to complete the MCC or Multi-Crew Cooperation course and the Jet Orientation course. Both of these courses can be completed in commercial simulators. The MCC course is designed to enhance your awareness of being part of the team in the cockpit. As the title suggests the JOC course is designed to familiarise you with the processes and controls of jet aircraft.

Having emptied your wallet (or drained the Bank of Mum & Dad) you are now ready to occupy a position within an airline as a junior officer. With so much money at stake it is essential that you protect your investment in yourself by spending it with reputable and authorised training organisations. Do your research thoroughly and visit the establishments before signing any agreements and handing over your funds. Always pay in installments rather than large lump sums.

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Best Flight Dispatcher Salaries

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In this post I’m going to talk about Flight Dispatcher salaries (sometimes also called Aircraft Dispatchers) and the renumeration they can expect in various countries around the globe. I’ll describe the salary range you can expect from junior to senior positions in the countries where jobs are plentiful. Then I’ll conclude this post with a few tips on how to get started on your career.

Aircraft or Flight Dispatchers are essential to the smooth running of any airport. Every commercial aircraft that takes off from an airport requires a team of people who ensure its departure is safe and on time. Flight Dispatchers are responsible for coordinating all the services and preparations required to ensure an aircraft leaves on schedule.

Flight Dispatchers start their shifts with checks on the status of the weather both current and forecast and for both the aircraft routes and destinations. For this reason, Flight Dispatchers need to be able to confidently interpret weather data, NOTAMs, and other forms of information relating to aircraft in flight. They arrange the cleaning of passenger aircraft and the loading of cargo aircraft. They arrange for the refuelling, routine maintenance checks, and any ad hoc servicing that may be required on the aircraft.

As with most jobs, pay and benefits are commensurate with experience and responsibilities, and Flight Dispatcher positions are no exception.

The following figures are averages collected in late 2018. They are base salaries so they don’t include any bonuses, overtime, or profit shares that may be offered. This is an important point to remember because such extras can make a significant difference to your take-home pay.

Flight Dispatcher Salaries Around The World

  • Australia, the national average is AU$55,000 Australian Dollars.
  • Canada, C$35,000 rising to C$57,000 Canadian Dollars.
  • Dubai, AED14,000 rising to AED208,000 Arab Emirate Dirhams.
  • Egypt, national average is 114,00 Egyptian Pounds.
  • Germany, the national average is €17,000 Euros.
  • India, Rs 407,000 rising to Rs 1,000,000 Rupees.
  • Malaysia, national average is 135,000 Ringgits.
  • New Zealand, national average is  101,000 New Zealand Dollars.
  • South Africa, national average is 342,000 Rand.
  • United Kingdom, £15,000 rising to £47,000 Pounds Sterling.
  • United States, $30,000 rising to $91,000 US Dollars.

How to become an Aircraft or Flight Dispatcher

The requirements for the role of Flight Dispatcher or Flight Operations Officer   may vary from country to country but some things are common to all. Candidates need to have an appreciation of the following subjects. The more proficient they are in one or more of these skills the more chance they have of securing a position;

  • Meteorology
  • Air Traffic Control
  • Communications
  • Airspace
  • Aerodynamics
  • Aircraft Systems
  • Weight and Balance
  • Minimum Equipment Lists
  • Emergency Procedures
  • Security
  • International Operations
  • Regulations
  • Icing
  • Flight Planning
  • Dispatch Resource Management
  • Practical Dispatching

Candidates will also need to be familiar with Flight Dispatch or Airport Operations software tools. These might include flight planning systems, crew scheduling,  aircraft performance analysis, and other related products pertaining to aircraft and airport operations.

Employers are looking for the relevant qualifications or work experience among those who started in a junior position within airfield operations. The IATA website lists dozens of suitable short courses suitable for those seeking knowledge and certification in airport operations. See: iata.org/training/.

As your career progresses you can specialise in an area or simply take on more responsibilities for managing resources, that could lead you into a managerial path that leads eventually to positions like Director of Operations at an airport.

The skills and experience gained in these roles are transportable giving you the option of applying for vacancies globally. One thing is for certain; as long as the aviation industry remains buoyant there will be demand for Flight Dispatchers, and if you’re a specialist the demand and the rewards will be higher.

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Main advantages of being a Flight Attendant

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In this post I’m going to briefly describe the disadvantages and advantages of being a Flight Attendant, or as they say in the UK, a member of the Cabin Crew.

The growing demand for air travel is creating fresh opportunities for anyone who wants to work in aviation. If you are planning to start an aviation career as a member of the Cabin Crew then this post is for you.

In 2015 Boeing predicated that the global aviation industry would need over half a million new pilots in the next twenty years. For every two members of the air crew in the cockpit the number of Flight Attendants will be proportional to the size of the aircraft.

Many Flight Attendants past and present have explained the advantages and disadvantages of the job. Here is a summary of what some of them have explained are the main pros and cons of this career.

The main role of Cabin Crew is to ensure the safety of passengers. Everything else, including fetching drinks or holding someone’s baby, is secondary to this task. Airline travel is very safe indeed but on the rare occasion there is an accident the crew are there to ensure the safe evacuation of the aircraft as quickly as possible, so although crew are trained and ready for emergencies their day to day tasks include some that are enjoyable and others that are a test of patience and personality.

Advantages of being a Flight Attendant

You will of course travel to many destinations and spend a few days in each. As you travel you’ll be able to broaden your mind meeting new people and learning about other cultures. All this travel might inspire you to learn another language or supplement your training with specialisation courses.

You will probably receive layover and accommodation pay and other financial perks of the job. When you go on holiday yourself you will probably be able to save money on airfares and pass on some discounts to your family. There is still a certain glamour attached to the idea of being in that uniform and many find the profession appealing for this reason.

You could find yourself moving into the five star world of private jets with all the pay and benefits that come with it. You might meet many famous, inspiring or interesting people, and not just in First Class.

Your uniform is provided for you so you don’t have to think about what to wear each day and you don’t wear out your own clothes. There is a great deal of variety in terms of fellow crew members and destinations, so there’s less risk of the boredom of routine.

You can develop a career path within the aviation industry that can last a lifetime. By being a writer, blogger or vlogger you can earn extra income telling stories and passing on your advice to newcomers.

Pax: can’t live with ’em, can’t live without ’em

Disadvantages of being a Flight Attendant

Just as the passengers can be interesting and fun some will be hard work and you will have your patience tested. You may have to clean up after both adults and children. The shifts and the jet lag can play havoc with your sleep patterns. Interrupted sleep and lack of freshly cooked meals may have an adverse effect on your mood and health.

Despite the variations the life can become routine depending on the airline and the routes. With some airlines the pay is low and industrial action is sometimes a fact of life for some Cabin Crew. Long term relationships can suffer when one partner is frequently away.

The responsibilities of Flight Attendants mean that the training can be difficult for some. You are likely to miss important dates in your family calendar and you will have to turn down invitations from friends from time to time.

These are just some of the main pros and cons. If you search YouTube you will find Flight Attendants explaining the things they love and those they hate about the job. Once you have earned your wings and you are working in the airline industry you’ll be able to look around for the position that suits you best. This might be short haul or long haul depending on your wants and needs.

When you have spent a few years flying you might leave aviation altogether or take a ground based position for the same airline. Perhaps you will become a Cabin Crew trainer or take on some other role within the company.

If you are drawn to this career then consider these and other advantages then approach the airlines for advice. Look out for their next recruitment drives and take the plunge.

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VIP Flight Attendant Jobs, Salaries, and Benefits

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In this post I’m going to talk about the pay and perks of VIP Flight Attendant jobs asd a member of the cabin crew on any private jet.

Would you like to travel the world in private aircraft, stay in the best hotels, mix with the super rich, and get paid to do so? Such ideas are what attract Flight Attendants to roles within business aviation and VIP hospitality.

However, as I’m sure you already know, such positions are only open to the select few with the right skills and experience. There are the Flight Attendants who work on private aircraft that ferry heads of industry and senior members of corporations from capital to capital. Then there are Flight Attendants whose passengers are wealthy individuals who use their own or rented private jets for the convenience and privacy that they provide.

So one thing that most, if not all these passengers have in common is the fact they are very wealthy, they regard time as a precious commodity, and they value discretion and privacy. Consequently, they need Flight Attendants who are discrete, efficient, and professional in every way. They may request that their pilots and cabin crew sign non-disclosure agreements, so you might have to forget blogging or vlogging about your travels and clients.

The clue is in the title; a private jet is not a public space, so the Flight Attendants need to keep in mind that what they see and hear is not to be disclosed elsewhere. Sometimes this is to protect the privacy of the individual and their families but it could also be because business meetings are held aboard that discretion is required.

The aircraft involved range from small business jets (bizjets) with limited seating and amenities, to airliners containing lounge areas, bedrooms, and bathrooms. You’ll quickly become familiar with Learjets, Cessna Citations, Embraers, Gulfstreams, and perhaps privately owned airliners like a Boeing 777 or even a 747.

For the ultra wealthy price is no object so the Flight Attendant should not be intimidated by ostentatious displays of wealth, expensive equipment, and famous people. Serving food and drink aboard such aircraft requires skills that can only be acquired by diligent effort and experience. You’ll be expected to prepare and serve dishes to the highest standards with presentation worthy of a Michelin star restaurant. Communication and language skills are important and knowledge of the protocols and customs of various nationalities is a great asset.

Those that succeed among the elite of cabin crew are often those with a wide range of skills. First Aid, CPR, and any other knowledge useful in a medical emergency are an asset.

Private jet Flight Attendants will often act as a Personal Assistant; booking, arranging, sourcing, and collecting for their clients. Perks of the job include large cash tips, exclusive tickets to events, and expensive fashion accessories given as gifts.

VIP Flight Attendant Jobs – Salaries

Base salaries (at the time of writing) are in the region of $55-65,000 but they vary greatly according to client and employer. Regular pay increases and annual bonuses are not uncommon so the package is very attractive. Being a member of the entourage may mean that you stay at the same top hotels and enjoy all the facilities that they offer, but in return you’ll be expected to be on call at short notice for sudden departures. This often means that you cannot plan your time or give commitments to others and this can put a strain on your social and personal life.

Flight Attendants also need to be selective in their choice of employer and contracts. Occasionally a client may overstep the boundaries of respect and professionalism by making inappropriate suggestions or making totally unacceptable demands. This means the Flight Attendant needs to be assertive enough to reject the advance and reaffirm the boundaries.

The rewards for these positions are high and therefore there is strong competition. Vacancies are few and the best jobs are not advertised at all. It’s more a case of knowing the right people and being ready to grab the opportunity with both hands.

There is little job security either so you need to keep in mind that you may be working elsewhere a year ahead. Another advantage of this role is the fact that you probably won’t have a supervisor breathing down your neck. You’ll be in charge or working closely with a few colleagues.

So if you aspire to a position like this then acquire the skills described, gain the experience in Business & First Class cabins, and do your research into employers, positions, and packages around the world.

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Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses

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Due to the global presence of aviation there Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Coursesavialable all over the world. I’m going to list some of the options available to you if you aspire to be an Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (AME). This is a follow up to the previous “Aircraft Engineer” post. It was clear from the response to it that there is a need for clarification on this subject so this post has been writtem to answer more questions.

I will list the courses available in various countries around the globe but first let’s summarise what we mean by Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (AME) or Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (LAME).

Just as pilots and air traffic controllers need to be licenced in order to operate safely so too do aviation engineers or technicians. The term engineer and technician mean the same thing in the aviation industry.

The technicians and engineers who service aircraft carry out crucial tasks that must be of the highest standards so it follows that they need to be trained by approved training organisations, and licensed by the national aviation authority in the country in which they operate. Some of these licences are recognised globally by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) but there are regional variations too.

Licence Types & Requirements

Here are some definitions of the licence types and their requirements. These are specific to countries governed by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) so check with your national civil aviation authority for any variations.

A Ramp or Line Maintenance Certifying Mechanic is someone with a Category A Licence obtained after a six month approved course and one year of certified experience. This enables them to carry out minor maintenance tasks and part replacements on operational aircraft between major servicing, and to certify the work done. Candidates can also study in their own time or choose a modular course, in which case they would need three years of certified experience in order to qualify.

Category A engineers can elect to specialise in these subjects:

  • A1 Fixed Wing Aircraft with Turbine Engines.
  • A2 Fixed Wing Aircraft with Piston Engines.
  • A3 Rotary Wing Helicopters with Turbine Engines.
  • A4 Rotary Wing Helicopters with Piston Engines.

To carry out more complex tasks, major overhauls and re-fits you need be a licenced Base Maintenance Certifying Technician. For this you need a Category B licence which can be obtained after a two year approved course and two years of certified experience. You can also obtain this through self study or a modular course but you would need five years of certified experience to qualify.

There are various specialisations for Category B licences too, and these are: B1.1 Fixed Wing Aircraft with Turbine Engines. B1.2 Fixed Wing Aircraft with Piston Engines.

  • B1.3 Rotary Wing Helicopters with Turbine Engines.
  • B1.4 Rotary Wing Helicopters with Piston Engines.
  • B2 Avionic Electronic systems fitted to all aircraft.

Here then are some approved training institutions offering Aircraft Maintenance Engineering courses.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses in Australia

Aviation Australia (aviationaustralia.aero) is a good place to start looking. As well as their main campus in Brisbane they also provide training through their partners for Sri Lankan and Malaysian students in Colombo and Kuala Lumpur.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses in Canada

Fanshawe College (fanshawec.ca) provides three Diploma and Advanced Diploma courses in Avionics and Mechanics.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses in Germany

Aviation Technical Training (avtt.de) offer basic courses and type ratings for several Embraers types, Bombardier Dash 8s, Cessna 525s, and Learjets.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses in India

There are numerous colleges with multiples of options in India. A good place to look is on Shiksha.com. On the home page, click on the Careers tab and then enter Aircraft Maintenance Engineer as your search term. Alternatively, using the top menu navigate to Engineering, Popular Specializations, Aircraft Maintenance.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses in New Zealand

The Air New Zealand Aviation Institute (aviationinstitute.co.nz) offers courses to school leavers and those new to the aviation industry. It also offers advanced courses for type rating on a range of Airbus, Boeing, and Bombardier types.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses in Sri Lanka

The Sri Lankan Aviation College offers several courses in Aviation Maintenance, and EASA Part 66 B1.1 and B1.2.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses in the UK

Air Service Training offer lots of courses and they also work in partnership with institutions in India, Nepal, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Indonesia, Jordan, Malaysia, and Iceland.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Courses in the USA

As you would expect of a country of this size and with aviation playing such a prominent role in America, there are dozens of places to study. Try StudyUSA.com and visit this page of results: studyusa.com/en/field-of-study/522/aviation-maintenance. Scroll to the footer to select the site in a different language.

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Avionics Technician Salary and Training

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In this post I’m going to list the Avionics Technician salary you might expect to earn in some of the countries around the world. I’ll describe the salary range you can expect in various countries around the globe. Then I’ll conclude this post with a few tips on how to get started on your training in the UK, India, and the USA.

Avionics Technicians are essential to the aviation and aerospace industries. They specialise in the installation, maintenance, and repair of the electronic components that make us so much of modern aircraft.

You may see any one of these terms used to describe the same role; Aircraft Electrical Systems Specialist, Avionics Electronics Technician, Aviation Electrical Technician, Avionics Electrical Technician, Aircraft Navigation/Communications Systems Technician, Avionics Bench Technician, Aircraft Bench Technician.

Avionics Technicians are responsible for installing the wiring, instrumentation, and software throughout the aircraft. This could include anything from flight instruments to passenger entertainment systems.

Avionics Technicians remove malfunctioning instruments and install new ones in both fixed and rotary wing aircraft. The instruments in need of repair will be sent to the Aircraft Bench Technicians who will examine and troubleshoot the device. They will then test those repairs to ensure the instruments are functioning correctly before they are used again on operational aircraft. The work of Avionics Technicians has a direct effect on the safety of aircraft, the crew, and the passengers, so it is a responsible position that requires skilled personnel.

As with most careers, pay and benefits are commensurate with experience and responsibilities. The following figures are annual averages collected late in 2018. They are base salaries so they don’t include any bonuses, overtime, or profit shares that may be offered. This is an important point to remember because such extras can make a significant difference to your take-home pay.

  • Australia, AU$55,000 rising to AU$96,000 Australian Dollars.
  • Canada, C$43,000 rising to C$80,000 Canadian Dollars.
  • Dubai, AED 58,000 rising to AED 473,000 Arab Emirate Dirhams.
  • India, Rs 256,000 rising to Rs 2,000,000 Rupees.
  • Philippines, PHP 180,000 rising to PHP 707,000 Philippine Pesos.
  • South Africa, R63,000 rising to R408,000 Rand.
  • United Kingdom, £23,000 rising to £37,000 Pounds Sterling.
  • United States, $25,000 rising to $72,000 US Dollars.

How to become an Avionics Technician

With so much of their work involving electronics it is obvious that a strong aptitude in this field is a must but so too are communication skills, attention to detail, critical thinking, and a logical and methodical mindset. Avionics Technicians tend to be people who can patiently troubleshoot problems to find the root cause, and carry out delicate repairs on sensitive instruments.

Many technicians start their career in the Armed Forces. The training and experience gained while working on complex military aircraft is second to none. For example, training in the British Army can lead to a Level 2 Advanced Apprenticeship in Engineering Manufacture, Level 3 Diploma in Engineering Technology, or a Bachelor of Science Degree (BSc) in Electronic Systems Engineering. Similarly, Aircraft Technicians (Avionics) can earn an average of £30,409 per year in the Royal Air Force.

Some technicians find job placements having completed further education and having obtained a bachelor’s degree in aviation engineering, aerospace engineering or electrical engineering. Others join apprenticeship schemes having obtained passes in English, Maths, and Science at high or secondary school level. They are then trained as part of vocational training schemes until suitably qualified and experienced.

The following website lists universities in the UK that offer Pilot and Aviation Studies degree courses, including some relevant to those seeking degrees in avionics and aerospace systems engineering: flightdeckfriend.com/university-pilot-degree-course.

Avionics Technician Salary – Training in India

Avionics Technician Salary – Training in the USA

  • Arizona State University, Cochise County Community College, and Enterprise State Community College in Arizona.
  • Henderson State University in Arkansas.
  • San Jose State University in California.
  • Guilford Technical College, North Carolina.
  • Delaware State University.
  • Ivy Tech Community College, Indiana.
  • Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Florida State College in Florida.
  • Middle Georgia State University, Georgia.
  • University of Nebraska.
  • Ohio State University.
  • Pennsylvania College of Technology and Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics in Pennsylvania.
  • North Central Institute, Tennessee.
  • Hallmark University, Texas.
  • Utah State University.

You may also be interested in an Aircraft Engineering Maintenance course.

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Cabin Crew Pay: What do airlines pay their Flight Attendants?

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In this post I’m going to list the salaries that Flight Attendants can expect and the Cabin Crew pay they might earn in various airlines around the world. I’ll list the salaries first, then summarise the role and its responsibilities, and conclude with some tips on getting started and your career prospects. If you are a current or ex-Flight Attendant please help others by posting a comment with your best tips for starting and succeeding in this career.

The following figures were collected in January 2019. At the time the average salary for cabin crew in the UK was about £17,000 – £29,000 GBP per year. The following salaries are for airlines based in the UK and are annual average ranges in Pounds Sterling.

  • British Airways (BA) £12,000 – £30,000 GBP.
  • British Midland (BMI) £15,000 – £29,000 GBP.
  • EasyJet £10,000 – £23,000 GBP.
  • Jet2.com £10,000 – £23,000 GBP.
  • Norwegian Air Shuttle £12,000 – £15,000 GBP.
  • Ryanair £10,000 – £24,000 GBP.
  • Thomas Cook £12,000 – £27,000 GBP.
  • TUI Group £12,000 – £14,000 GBP.
  • Virgin Atlantic Airways £9,000 – £16,000 GBP.

The following annual averages are for airlines based in the USA and are in US Dollars. These figures include bonuses and other compensation.

  • AirTran Airways $35,000 USD.
  • Alaska Airlines $56,000 USD.
  • Allegiant Travel Company $31,000 USD.
  • American Airlines $39,000 USD.
  • Continental Airlines $29,000 USD.
  • Delta Airlines $49,000 USD.
  • ExpressJet Airlines $31,000 USD.
  • Frontier Airlines $19,000 USD.
  • JetBlue Airways $38,000 USD.
  • Mesa Airlines $21,000 USD.
  • Piedmont Airlines $23,000 USD.
  • PSA Airlines $18,000 USD.
  • Republic Airways $26,000 USD.
  • SkyWest Airlines $21,000 USD.
  • Southwest Airlines $51,000 USD.
  • Spirit Airlines $45,000 USD.
  • Trans States Airlines $20,000 USD.
  • United Airlines $44,000 USD.
  • US Airways $34,000 USD.
  • World Airways $49,000 USD.

In Canada a flight attendant can expect to earn between C$23,000 and C$60,000 before bonuses and other compensation. For example, the average for Air Canada has been quoted at $54,000 CAD.

Middle East and other airlines

These are annual salary averages in UAE dirhams.

  • Air Arabia 120,000dhs dirhams.
  • flydubai 144,000dhs dirhams.
  • Emirates 78,000 – 180,000dhs dirhams.
  • Singapore Airlines 120,000dhs dirhams.
  • Responsibilities of a Flight Attendant.

Flight Attendants are required on any commercial flight that has more than 19 passengers aboard. One Flight Attendant is required for every 50 passengers.

On large aircraft there is usually a hierarchy of cabin crew which might include; a Purser, and a Chief Purser sometimes also called In-flight Service Manager, Flight Service Manager, Customer Service Manager,  or Cabin Service Director.

The Flight Attendants’ primary role is the safety of the passengers but as we all know they have many other responsibilities too.

Flight Attendants start their shifts with a briefing given by the Captain of the flight in which he or she summarises the route, the aircraft, the weather, and any other relevant information relating to the aircraft and the passengers. Once they have been briefed the Flight Attendants will start checking the equipment aboard the aircraft to ensure it is all present, serviceable, and re-supplied where necessary.

During the flight they ensure the safety and comfort of passengers. In the event of any type of emergency, minor or major, they are trained to respond.

Cabin Crew Pay By Country

  • Australia, between AU$36,000 and  AU$64,000 Australian Dollars.
  • Canada, C$12,000 rising to C$38,000 Canadian Dollars.
  • Dubai, AED35,000 rising to AED234,000 Arab Emirate Dirhams.
  • Egypt, E£68,000 rising to E£117,000 Egyptian Pounds. Germany, €11,000 rising to €27,000 Euros.
  • India, Rs209,000 rising to Rs908,000 Rupees.
  • Malaysia, RM1,000 rising to RM106,000 Ringgits.
  • New Zealand, $35,000 rising to  $60,000 New Zealand Dollars.
  • South Africa, R60,000 rising to R304,000 Rand.
  • United Kingdom, £13,000 rising to £41,000 Pounds Sterling.
  • United States, $21,000 rising to $74,000 US Dollars.

How to become a Flight Attendant

The requirements for the role of Flight Attendant are fairly standard throughout the aviation industry all around the globe. Due to a high turnover of staff the airlines have to recruit and train new cabin crew frequently, so look out for news of recruitment drives by the airlines of your choice.

Obviously you’ll need to be energetic, able to communicate clearly, and quick to learn a variety of new skills that will be taught during training. Airlines are looking for people with good customer service skills. If you can speak two or more languages it’s a distinct advantage.

A Flight Attendant is an ambassador for the airline and its brand so personal appearance and grooming is very important. Employers are looking for a professional image and they are not keen on visible tattoos or overt piercings.

After 3-6 weeks of training and passing several tests you will be assigned to your first route. There is likely to be further tests and training as your career progresses. As you gain experience, perhaps on short haul flights to begin with, you can add to it with long haul flights and looking after Club & First Class passengers. In time you may gain promotion with all the added responsibilities and pay increases. The skills and experience gained will enable you to transfer to other roles within any other airline too.

One thing is for certain; as long as the aviation industry remains buoyant there will be demand for Flight Attendants, particularly for those with a track record for reliability, punctuality, and professionalism.

Prospects for Flight Attendants

If you remain working as a Flight Attendant you can work your way up the the company ladder or move about within the airlines. You’ll gain experience, learn new skills, and perhaps learn a second or third language. Your options will increase and you could be rewarded with promotions or moving into the role of a VIP or Corporate Flight Attendant.

Alternatively, you could cease flying but continue to work for the airlines in a ground based role with more regular hours. Outside of the airlines you could use your skills in another role within, for example, the hotel or the cruise ship industry. So you may start on low pay with long anti-social hours but the training and experience make you a very employable person in the years to come.

A few final tips about Cabin Crew careers

If you intend to move to another airline be sure to do your research first. Search for reviews of the airline written by current or ex-employees on job seeker websites.

Note that the culture and attitude toward Flight Attendants varies, particularly from country to country. Some airlines demand strict behaviour and even enforce curfews on their staff. They can also show an unreasonable lack of tolerance regarding even the smallest of errors, and no job security.

So be certain before you move to a new airline that it’s the right choice by taking into account all the things you take for granted with your current employer.

Good luck with your career!

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How to become an Air Traffic Controller

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If you’ve ever wondered how to become an Air Traffic Controller then this post might give you some direction. Air traffic control jobs are available for anyone seeking a first or second career in aviation.  The demand has been created by both the natural churn of controllers and the growth in the aviation industry.

Air Traffic Controllers are responsible for the safe and expeditious movement of aircraft in and around airports and other high traffic areas. They coordinate take-offs and landings and make sure all the aircraft stay a safe distance apart. Controllers communicate with pilots during flights to direct them during take-off and landing and to tell them about their route, weather conditions, runway closures, and other important information.

The main purpose of air traffic control is to help pilots to fly their aircraft safely to their destinations. The job is also important for minimizing delays at the airport. Air Traffic Controllers help aircraft arrive and leave as smoothly and quickly as possible while remaining within safety parameters.

What’s it like to be an Air Traffic Controller?

Air traffic controllers usually work in control facilities or towers and consequently since most are responsible for aircraft take-offs and landings ATC towers are usually within the airfield boundary, but some air traffic control facilities may be located miles away from the nearest airport. Some control facilities may be semi-dark, in order to enhance concentration on the information displayed on screens.

Air traffic control jobs are essential, but they can be stressful at times. Controllers usually work eight-hour shifts, during which a lot of concentration is required. Aircraft fly at all hours of the day and night, so Air Traffic Controllers may have to switch between day and night shifts, or work on weekends and holidays. The Federal Aviation Authority limits shifts to 10 hours and requires that controllers have at least 9 hours of rest between shifts.

How to Become an Air Traffic Controller

One way to become an air traffic controller in the USA is to get an Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree from an approved Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative program. There are 36 schools in the United States that offer AT-CTI programs. You can also become a controller if you have at least three years of work experience, a bachelor’s degree in another field, or a combination of the two.

According to the Federal Aviation Authority, one year of college or 30 semester hours is equal to nine months of work experience. To begin a career in air traffic control in the United States, you must be younger than 31 years of age. You also must complete training at the Federal Aviation Authority Academy in Oklahoma City, pass a pre-employment test, and undergo a medical exam.

In the UK you can become an air traffic controller through trainee schemes run by NATS (National Air Traffic Services). To be eligible for consideration you’ll need a minimum of 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 or equivalent qualifications, including English and Maths. Training takes place at the NATS centre near Fareham in Hampshire.

Ab initio training lasts up to a year and there is likely to be more training as your career develops. If you’ve got experience as a military air traffic controller, or military or commercial pilot then you may also apply for a position. Career Prospects for Air Traffic Controllers.

As of 2018, there were about 26,000 air traffic controllers working in the United States. In the UK there are currently about 1,700 Controllers  employed by NATS. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the number of air traffic control jobs will grow by 3 percent by 2026.

The field is highly competitive with many candidates applying for each opening, but jobs do open up fairly regularly as air traffic controllers are eligible to retire earlier than most people.

Salaries for Air Traffic Controllers

In 2018, the median salary for air traffic controllers in the USA was $124,540. The highest 10 percent of workers earned over $175,800, and the lowest 10 percent of workers earned less than $67,440.

In the UK trainees can expect to earn about £17,000 per annum rising to £30-40,000 pa once fully qualified. These are base salary figures and don’t include shift allowances, overtime, and bonuses. Senior controllers at Heathrow and Swanwick can earn up to £100,000 pa.

To be eligible to beome an Air Traffic Controller in India you’ll need a degree in either engineering, electronics, or electrical disciplines. Candidates should be aged between 21 and 27 and can expect to earn a salary of 40,000 Rupees per month as trainees.

Your salary depends on your years of experience, the location of your facility, and the complexity of your flight paths. As you complete extra levels of on-the-job training, your salary may increase.

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Aircraft Engineer Salaries & Training

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LIke all pay within aviation, aircraft engineer salaries start low and rise with experience and additional training. Aircraft or aerospace engineers are essential to the aviation and aerospace industries. Every aircraft that flies, whether it’s a flying club’s Cessna 152, a private jet, an Airbus A380, or a F-35 Lightning requires aircraft engineers to keep it flying.

All aircraft, large or small, simple or complex, require qualified engineers who carry out the mandatory checks and maintenance on the airframe, engines, and instruments. These checks and scheduled maintenance may be prompted by time periods or the number of hours an aircraft has spent in the air. As well as servicing existing aircraft, aerospace engineers may also be employed to research, design, and test new aircraft, missiles, satellites, and spacecraft.

Unmanned aircraft fly without a pilot aboard but no aircraft can fly without an engineer to build, service, and maintain it. Pay and benefits are commensurate with experience and responsibilities, and aircraft engineering is no exception.

Aircraft Engineer Salaries

The following figures are averages collected in late 2018. They are base salaries so they don’t include any bonuses, overtime, or profit shares that may be offered. This is an important point to remember because such extras can make a significant difference to your take-home pay.

  • Australia, AU$48,000 rising to AU$120,000 Australian Dollars.
  • Canada, C$40,000 rising to C$93,000 Canadian Dollars.
  • Dubai, AED 110,000 rising to AED 585,000 Arab Emirate Dirhams.
  • Egypt, EGP 49,000 rising to EGP 1,184,000 Egyptian Pounds.
  • Germany, €24,000 rising to €77,000 Euros.
  • India, Rs 207,000 rising to Rs 2,345,000 Rupees.
  • Ireland, €23,000 rising to €71,000 Euros.
  • Malaysia, RM 21,600 rising to RM 236,000 Ringgits.
  • New Zealand, NZ$41,000 rising to  NZ$100,000 New Zealand Dollars.
  • South Africa, R148,000 rising to R595,000 Rand.
  • United Kingdom, £22,000 rising to £60,000 Pounds Sterling.
  • United States, $29,000 rising to $108,000 US Dollars.

Additionally, these figures were compiled in 2019:

A licensed aircraft engineer earns a average salary of $40.00 per hour. The average salary for alicensed aircraft engineer in the United States is $41.67 per hour, while in Canada the average salary is $38.50 per hour.

In the United Kingdom, a licensed aircraft engineer earns an average salary of £30.00 per hour, while in Australia the average salary is AU$50.00 per hour.

Aircraft engineers in New Zealand earn an average salary of NZD$35.00 per hour, while those in South Africa earn an average salary of R35.00 per hour.

Finally, licensed aircraft engineers in India earn an average salary of Rs 200 per hour. As you can see, there is a wide range of salaries for licensed aircraft engineers around the world, but on average they earn a comfortable wage.

How to become a licenced Aircraft Engineer or Technician

An aircraft engineer is responsible for the design, construction, and maintenance of aircraft and spacecraft. The three main disciplines of aircraft engineering are Aeronautical, Avionics, and Structural.

To become an aircraft engineer, one must complete a four-year degree in engineering from an accredited college or university. In addition, many employers require certification from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) or the appropriate body in the country of training.

After completing their training, aircraft engineers typically begin their career working in entry-level positions under the supervision of more experienced engineers. With experience and proven competence, they can eventually advance to higher-level positions such as lead engineer or project manager.

The safety of aircraft and therefore the lives of passengers and crew rely upon the expertise of engineers, so the training and qualifications are demanding. You’ll need a strong technical aptitude and attention to detail.

There are several grades of engineers; for example, Ramp or Line Maintenance Mechanics who service existing aircraft, replacing parts, and carrying out routine maintenance. Then there are Base Technicians who carry out overhauls on older or more complex aircraft.

Then there are the categories associated with the various aircraft types; fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft, so the candidate has to choose which aircraft type interests them and therefore which path of training and certification they want to follow.

Candidates who are still at school should focus on chemistry, physics and mathematics. They should then aim for a foundation degree, or a degree in aerospace engineering, avionics, or a related subject.

The college or university might be able to provide you with on the job training as part of the course. Alternatively, you could work your way up by starting as an apprentice engineer with an airline or commercial aviation business. As your skills grow and you gain more experience you can study for licensing and certification for you chosen aircraft type.

Aircraft Engineer Salaries: Prospects

As your career progresses you can specialise in an area; becoming an expert in aerodynamics, fuel efficiency, space technology, or investigating air accidents. Alternatively, you can gain the necessary experience and certifications by joining one of the armed forces.

One thing is for certain; as long as the aviation industry remains buoyant there will be demand for aircraft engineers, and if you’re a specialist the demand and the rewards will be higher.

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Advantages & Disadvantages of Air Hostess Careers

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There are many advantages but also some disadvantages of air hostess careers (as a flight attendant, or as a member of the Cabin Crew). The ongoing demand for air travel is creating fresh opportunities for anyone who wants to work in aviation. If you are planning to start an aviation career as a member of the Cabin Crew then this video is for you.

Back in 2015 Boeing predicated that the global aviation industry would need over half a million new pilots in the next twenty years. For every two members of the air crew in the cockpit the number of Flight Attendants will be proportional to the size of the aircraft.

Many Flight Attendants past and present have explained the advantages and disadvantages of the job. Here is a summary of what some of them have explained are the main pros and cons of this career.

Note: The terms flight attendant and cabin crew are the modern equivalent of the older terms air hostess and air stewardess. These changes reflect the evolution of international passenger air travel from the 1930s to the present day.

Passenger Safety

The main role of the Cabin Crew is to ensure the safety of passengers.

Everything else, including fetching drinks or holding someone’s baby, is secondary to this task. Airline travel is very safe indeed but on the rare occasion there is an accident the crew are there to ensure the safe evacuation of the aircraft as quickly as possible.

So although crew are trained and ready for emergencies their day to day tasks include some that are enjoyable and others that are a test of patience and personality.

Advantages of Air Hostess Careers

  • You will of course travel to many destinations and spend a few days in each. As you travel you’ll be able to broaden your mind meeting new people and learning about other cultures. All this travel might inspire you to learn another language or supplement your training with specialisation courses.
  • You will probably receive layover and accommodation pay and other financial perks of the job.
  • When you go on holiday yourself you will probably be able to save money on airfares and pass on some discounts to your family. There is still a certain glamour attached to the idea of being in that uniform and many find the profession appealing for this reason.
  • You could find yourself moving into the five star world of private jets with all the pay and benefits that come with it.
  • You might meet many famous, inspiring or interesting people, and not just in First Class.
  • Your uniform is provided for you so you don’t have to think about what to wear each day and you don’t wear out your own clothes.
  • There is a great deal of variety in terms of fellow crew members and destinations, so there’s less risk of the boredom of routine.
  • You can develop a career path within the aviation industry that can last a lifetime.
  • By being a writer, blogger or vlogger you can earn extra income telling stories and passing on your advice to newcomers.

Disadvantages of Air Hostess Careers

  • Just as the passengers can be interesting and fun some will be hard work and you will have your patience tested.
  • You may have to clean up after both adults and children.
  • The shifts and the jet lag can play havoc with your sleep patterns.
  • Interrupted sleep and lack of freshly cooked meals may have an adverse effect on your mood and health.
  • Despite the variations the life can become routine depending on the airline and the routes.
  • With some airlines the pay is low and industrial action is sometimes a fact of life for some Cabin Crew.
  • Long term relationships can suffer when one partner is frequently away.
  • The responsibilities of Flight Attendants mean that the training can be difficult for some.
  • You are likely to miss important dates in your family calendar and you will have to turn down invitations from friends from time to time.

Starting Your Air Hostess Career

These are just some of the main pros and cons. If you search YouTube you will find Flight Attendants explaining the things they love and those they hate about the job.

Once you have earned your wings and you are working in the airline industry you’ll be able to look around for the position that suits you best. This might be short haul or long haul depending on your wants and needs.

When you have spent a few years flying you might leave aviation altogether or take a ground based position for the same or another airline. Such a position might mean you can keep to regular hours and sleep in your own bed every night. Perhaps you will become a Cabin Crew trainer or take on some other role within the company.

If you are drawn to this career then consider all these advantages and disadvantages, and then approach the airlines for advice. Look out for their next recruitment drives and then apply.

Let me know what your aspirations are in the comments section below.

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How To Become A Commercial Airline Pilot

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In this post I summarise the requirements and try to explain how to become a commercial airline pilot. I covered this subject in a previous video made in August 2017. That video continues to receive a lot of views but it has become clear from the enquiries I received since that there are still some unanswered questions. So if you’re still unsure of how to become a commercial pilot then here are a few pointers.

Prospects for Commercial Airline Pilots

Let’s start with the prospects for anyone considering a career as a pilot. The much publicised 2016 forecast by Boeing for a huge global demand for pilots in the next two decades persists. Even taking into account the regional variations in the figures it is likely that Europe alone will require 80-90,000 new commercial pilots in the next 20 years.

Update: This post was written before the devastating consequences to the airline industry by the Coronavirus pandemic. However, even though many airline staff are likely to lose their jobs there will be opportunities in the future due to natural wastage and churn of staff through the coming years.

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Commercial Airline Pilot Salaries

What do airline pilots earn? What salaries can you expect?

As you can probably imagine, salaries vary according to the size of the airline, the aircraft type, and the pilot’s experience. A recently qualified First Officer for a small, regional airline can expect a starting salary of around £25,000 pa.

Larger airlines may offer more and the salaries will eventually increase in proportion to the experience. For example, more experienced First Officers can look forward to £36,000 to £48,000 pa.

Once you’ve been promoted to Captain you can expect a salary of £57,000 to £78,000 for a medium sized airline. If your employer is one of the major operators then salaries of between £97,000 and £140,000 or more are the industry norm.

How To Become A Commercial Airline Pilot: Reality Check

If you want to end up in the cockpit of a major airline then there is a long road ahead. There is a great deal of study to be done and a lot of money to be spent. Once qualified you will still need to compete with other eager young pilots for positions within airlines.

If you’re still at school or college then make sure you get five GCSEs and two A-levels, ideally in Maths, English, and Science, and, at the risk of stating the obvious, you need to be fluent in English too.

The distance and the requirements may seem overwhelming at first but like all long, hard journeys it’s persistent effort, patience, and sacrifice that leads to eventual success. One step at a time seems like a cliché but it’s true. Focus on what is in front of you on any given day. Develop the self-discipline to take steps toward your goal each week. As the months roll by you will be able to look back at sure and certain progress.

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Chocks away then, where do you start?

For reasons that should be obvious, anyone wishing to fly aircraft commercially needs to be fit and healthy. You’ll need to pass a Class 1 Medical examination and maintain that standard throughout your career.

If you have any questions or concerns about the medical certificate then please check the CAA website.

Next, you’ll need access to a big pile of money. The cost of training and the prospect of running up a huge debt can be a little daunting. Obtaining an Airline Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL) is likely to take up two years and cost over £100,000.

If you or your family are unable to sponsor you then the money will need to be borrowed. However, there are finance schemes available specifically designed for this purpose. It may be possible to obtain finance through an airline and then pay the money back through salary deductions once you are employed. If you do self-finance then make sure the necessary safeguards are in place to protect your money. Study the terms and conditions carefully and make sure your money is protected should the training company suddenly cease trading.

Sadly, both private and commercial student pilots have learned the hard way that there are risks associated with handing over large sums of money to flying schools that go out of business weeks later.

Flight Training, Day One

If you have no flying experience at all then you can join what is called an integrated ATPL course. These are designed for ab initio students. If you’re not familiar with your Latin, ab initio means ‘from the beginning’.

Integrated ATPL courses are full time courses provided by Approved Training Organisations. The advantage of an integrated course is the continuity of training. You will focus on the training and nothing else.

The disadvantage is that you need not only the money for training but all living expenses available to you throughout.

If you have some flying experience or you’re unable to commit to full time training then you can opt for a modular ATPL course. As the name suggests, this enables candidates to complete things stage by stage or module by module. The advantage of the modular course is that you can keep working to pay your bills. You fit the training and study in around your job.

The disadvantage is the lack of continuity in training and the commitment required to juggle a full time job with intense study and training.

For a list of all current CAA Approved Training schools please visit the CAA website.

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Advanced Flight Training

You will have had many hours of flight training, simulator time, classroom lectures, and self-study. Eventually, whether on an integrated or a modular course, you will pass several milestones.

These will include:

  • First Solo
  • Private Pilots Licence (PPL)
  • Night Rating
  • Instrument Rating (IR)
  • Multi Engine Piston (MEP) rating
  • Commercial Pilots Licence (CPL)

With the CPL/IR with MEP achieved you could branch out into paid employment at this stage. You could become a Flying Instructor or a pilot of light and medium commercial aircraft, but onwards and upwards – your goal is the airlines. After a lot more study and exams you’ll eventually obtain your Airline Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL).

So far, so good, but the training doesn’t end here. Your ATPL is ‘frozen’ i.e. it’s recognised that you’ve completed the theory but you don’t have enough flying experience yet. This is when most candidates will start knocking on doors and elbowing their way to the front of the queue for a coveted position within an airline.

Next comes line training with your airline to build up a total of 1,500 hours in your logbook. You’ll also need a type rating for a specific aircraft type. Typically, you’ll become type rated on aircraft like Boeing B737 or an Airbus A320. There are hundreds of these types flying on short haul routes. If you’re lucky the airline will pay for this stage of training but again, you may need to pay up yourself.

Other Flight Training Options

As an alternative to the ATPL some UK airlines require only a Multi-Crew Pilot Licence (MPL). This enables a pilot to reach the position of First Officer but to be a Captain the pilot will still need to obtain an ATPL.

Another option is to attend one of the new university apprenticeship courses. Several universities in the UK now offer full time courses that lead to a frozen ATPL. Google for phrases like ‘university frozen ATPL’ for a list of universities and the courses they offer. The course content, fees, and degrees on completion vary so check each one for details.

This route gives access to other options in terms of funding and loans. Having reached the position of First Officer with an airline you can look forward to a long and rewarding career.

Thanks for reading. Please post your questions, comments, and feedback below. Please like and share this post with others who may be interested in its content.

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Ace The Technical Pilot Interview 2/E
  • McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
  • Bristow, Gary (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 368 Pages - 05/21/2012 (Publication Date) - McGraw Hill (Publisher)
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Air Traffic Control Jobs – How to Start a Career in ATC

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Air traffic control jobs are available for anyone seeking a first or second career in aviation.  The demand has been created by both the natural churn of controllers and the growing aviation industry.

Air traffic controllers are responsible for the safe and expeditious movement of aircraft in and around airports and other-high traffic areas. They coordinate take-offs and landings and make sure all the aircraft stay a safe distance apart.

Controllers communicate with pilots during flights to direct them during take-off and landing and to tell them about their route, weather conditions, runway closures, and other important information.

The main purpose of air traffic control is to help the aircraft safely get to its destination. The job is also important for minimizing delays at the airport. Air traffic controllers help aircraft arrive and leave as smoothly and quickly as possible while staying safe.

What It’s Like to Be an Air Traffic Controller

Air traffic controllers usually work in control facilities or towers. Because most are responsible for aircraft take-offs and landings, it’s common to work near large airports. The lighting and air conditioning in control centers is optimized for comfort and concentration.

Air traffic control jobs are essential, but they can be stressful. Controllers usually work eight-hour shifts, but they have to focus carefully the entire time. Aircraft fly at all hours of the day and night, so air traffic controllers may have to switch between day and night shifts or work on weekends and holidays. The FAA limits shifts to 10 hours and requires that controllers have at least nine hours of rest between shifts.

How to Become an Air Traffic Controller

One way to become an air traffic controller is to get an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an approved Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) program. There are 36 schools in the United States that offer AT-CTI programs.

You can also become a controller if you have at least three years of work experience, a bachelor’s degree in another field, or a combination of the two. According to the FAA, one year of college or 30 semester hours is equal to nine months of work experience.

To begin a career in air traffic control in the United States, you must be younger than 31 years of age. You also must complete training at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City, pass a pre-employment test, and undergo a medical exam.

Career Prospects for Air Traffic Controllers

As of 2017, there were just under 23,000 air traffic controllers working in the United States. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the number of air traffic control jobs will grow by 3 percent by 2026. The field is highly competitive with many candidates applying for each opening, but jobs do open up fairly regularly as air traffic controllers are eligible to retire earlier than most people.

Air Traffic Control Jobs – Salaries

In 2017, the median salary for air traffic controllers was $124,540. The highest 10 percent of workers earned over $175,800, and the lowest 10 percent of workers earned less than $67,440.

Your salary depends on your years of experience, the location of your facility, and the complexity of your flight paths. As you complete extra levels of on-the-job training, your salary may increase.

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Air Traffic Control Career Prep: A Comprehensive Guide to One of the Best-Paying Federal Government Careers, Including Test Preparation for the Initial ATC Exams
  • It includes the test preparation for the initial Air Traffic Control exams.
  • Also includes instructions on how to access the ATC Career Prep Software Suite (compatible with Windows operating systems ONLY) so you can become familiar with and practice the 8 tests in the AT-SAT exam.
  • Mattson, Patrick (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 240 Pages - 09/01/2006 (Publication Date) - Aviation Supplies & Academics, Inc. (Publisher)
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