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Why Every Aviation Safety Briefing Should Include a UFO Status Report

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Isn’t it time we took UFOs seriously and included them in every aviation safety briefing? In light of recent events in the USA and Canada, not to mention hundreds of other such incidents over the years, reported by both civilian and military pilots, UFOs (or UAP if you prefer the less stigmatised term) are a fact of life.  They are seen by trained aviation professionals, sometimes with muliple corroborating reports, and their sightings are backed up by radar data, as well as FLIR and other camera data in the case of military captures. Until an unidentified, anomalous aerial object or vehicle is identified then it is by definition an unknown, and as such may move in unpredictable ways which may pose a risk to other air traffic, whether it’s advanced tech from a foreign power, a black project, or something else.

Today’s Aviation Safety Briefing

UFOs have been a topic of speculation and debate for many years, and their inclusion in aviation safety briefings is a subject that has been gaining increasing attention. There are several reasons why this should be the case.

First and foremost, there is the risk that they may pose a hazard aircraft. If you’re in any doubt about this, listen to military pilots describe how objects have flown so close to their aircraft that an Airprox report would be filed in the air, had the encounter been in UK airspace.

Pilots and air traffic controllers are not able to identify and communicate with anomalous aerial phenomena.  They fly at all altitudes, sometimes at extraordinary speeds, and change course instantaneously.  Such flying characteristics put the safety of aircraft operating in the same airspace at risk.

By including reported sightings of UFOs in aviation safety briefings, pilots and air traffic controllers would at least be made aware of this aerial activity. Even if there seems to be little anyone can do to predict the movement of the UAP, they can at least be on the lookout for them in the airpsace where they have previously been reported.

Why Ufos Should Be Included In Every Aviation Safety Briefing
What else is up there?
Photo by Danist Soh on Unsplash

Technology and reporting

The study of UFOs has the potential to improve aviation safety in other ways. For example, the study of anomalous aerial phenomena may lead to new discoveries in aviation technology that could enhance safety and efficiency. By including information on UFOs and UAP in aviation safety briefings, pilots and aviation professionals could collect data that might one day lead to new discoveries in the fields of aviation and aerospace technologies.

Another reason why they should be included in aviation safety briefings is the fact that they are increasingly being taken seriously by government agencies and military organisations. In 2020, the US government has announced the existence of the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force (UAPTF), and in 2022 this was followed by the establishment of the All-domain Anomaly Resolution Office (AARO). Several videos of UFO sightings by US Navy pilots (though more are said to exist which are more detailed and as yet unreleased). This indicates that UFOs and UAP are not simply the domain of conspiracy theorists, but rather a serious scientific and security concern.

By including information on UFOs and UAP in aviation safety briefings, aviation professionals will be better prepared to engage with the subject in a serious and informed manner. This will help to reduce the stigma and scepticism that has long surrounded the study of anomalous aerial phenomena, and encourage more researchers and professionals to take the topic seriously.

The redundant stigma attached to the UFO phenomenon

The subject of UFOs has long been stigmatised, and many people, including journalists and scientists, have been reluctant to take it seriously. While recent events have helped to legitimise the study of anomalous aerial phenomena, the stigma surrounding UFOs persists, and many people are still hesitant to engage with the topic.

One of the reasons for the persistent stigma surrounding UFOs is the fear of ridicule. The subject has long been associated with conspiracy theories, pseudoscience, and hoaxes, and people who express an interest in the subject are often dismissed as gullible or mentally unstable. This fear of ridicule has made many journalists and scientists reluctant to engage with the topic, for fear of damaging their reputations or being associated with a subject that is not taken seriously.

Another reason for the reluctance of journalists and scientists to engage with the topic of UFOs is the lack of credible evidence. While there have been many reports of UFO sightings and encounters, much of the evidence is anecdotal or circumstantial, and there is a lack of concrete scientific evidence to support claims of extraterrestrial life or advanced technology. This has made it difficult for scientists to study the topic in a serious and rigorous way, as there is often little empirical evidence to work with.

Despite these challenges, there have been some notable exceptions to the general reluctance to engage with the topic of UFOs. One example is the work of Dr. Jacques Vallée, a computer scientist and ufologist who has been studying the phenomenon for over 50 years. Vallée’s research is characterised by a rigorous scientific approach, and he has published numerous books and articles on the topic of UFOs, arguing that they represent a real and important scientific mystery that warrants serious investigation.

Typhoon Jet - Ufos?
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Serious journalists who write about UFOs

Similarly, there have been some journalists who have taken the subject of UFOs seriously, despite the risk of ridicule. One example is Leslie Kean, a journalist and author who has written extensively on the subject of UFOs. Kean’s book, “UFOs: Generals, Pilots, and Government Officials Go on the Record,” is a serious and well-researched examination of the topic, featuring interviews with high-ranking military officials, pilots, and government officials who have witnessed UFO sightings.

Other examples of journalists taking the subject seriously include Ross Culthart and Bryce Zabel, who have both written books on the subject and host a podcast (Need To Know) that covers the breaking news about it, and there is of course George Knapp of KLAS-TV who broke the Bob Lazar story in 1989 and now hosts a podcast (Weaponized) with filmmaker Jeremy Corbell that also discusses latest developments.

Despite these exceptions, the reluctance of journalists and scientists to engage with the topic of UFOs remains a persistent challenge. However, recent events have helped to shift attitudes towards the subject, and more people are beginning to take it seriously. The release of classified documents and videos of UFO sightings by the US military has given credence to some of the claims made by ufologists, and the US government’s acknowledgment of the existence of the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force (UAPTF) has added further legitimacy to the subject.

The stigma surrounding the topic of UFOs has long discouraged serious scientific inquiry and mainstream media coverage, but recent events have helped to shift attitudes towards the subject, and more people are beginning to take it seriously. While there are still many challenges to studying the topic of UFOs, the increasing legitimacy of the subject represents an important step forward in our understanding of the universe and our place in it.

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Ridicule is no longer an appropriate response

Ridicule is a common tactic used by the media to diffuse debate and spoil any serious discussion of anomalous aerial phenomena. The use of dismissive and derogatory language such as “little green men” or “woo-woo” reinforces the idea that the study of UFOs is not a serious scientific pursuit, but rather the domain of kooks and conspiracy theorists. Terms used by journalists, such as “UFO buff” or “UFO enthusiast” are employed to characterise individuals as mere hobbyists.  This approach effectively closes off any serious debate and discourages people from engaging with the topic in a meaningful way.

The use of ridicule to dismiss the study of UFOs is also a common tactic employed by sceptics and debunkers who seek to undermine the credibility of the subject. By framing the study of UFOs as a fringe interest or a pseudoscientific pursuit, they are able to dismiss any evidence or arguments that support the existence of anomalous aerial phenomena. This can be an effective way of shutting down any serious debate on the topic and discouraging others from engaging with the subject. No one wants have their career tarnished by speaking up for the “tinfoil hat wearers”.

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Not clever, not funny
Photo by Tom Radetzki on Unsplash

The use of ridicule is also perpetuated in popular culture, where UFOs are often portrayed as the domain of the “X-Files” or other works of science fiction. This reinforces the idea that the study of UFOs is not a serious scientific pursuit, but rather a fictional pursuit that has little relevance to the real world. This portrayal of UFOs in popular culture further contributes to the stigma surrounding the subject and makes it more difficult for serious researchers to be taken seriously.

The use of ridicule to dismiss the study of UFOs is not only counterproductive, but it is also intellectually dishonest. By dismissing the study of UFOs without engaging with the evidence and arguments that support the existence of anomalous aerial phenomena, sceptics and debunkers are effectively closing themselves off to potentially important scientific discoveries. This approach reinforces the status quo and makes it more difficult for researchers to explore new scientific frontiers.

There are already notable exceptions to this approach and the era of denial and ridicule is coming to an end. It has been a slow process but cracks in the wall have appeared. It will only take another big push and the wall will come tumbling down. It’s time, as the late nuclear physicist and professional ufologist Stanton Friedman once said, for journalists to “do your job” and investigate the phenomena, probe for answers, not to take government statements at face value, and dig deeper for the truth.

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